Digest This

Click on the topics below to learn how probiotics can improve your digestive health, naturally.

Are you taking a probiotic when you’re prescribed an antibiotic?

Antibiotics can be effective pharmaceutical weapons that treat a myriad of infections. As of late, however, antibiotics have received a lot of attention from medical experts for all the wrong reasons.

A growing number of medical reports have concluded exposing your body to too many antibiotics may be more hazardous than helpful, triggering a greater number of Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infections that can be severe and even deadly.

C. diff infections cause nearly 14,000 deaths annually, with 90 percent involving people age 65 and older. Medical experts say patients who have taken antibiotics very recently are at the highest risk of contracting them.

Don’t take antibiotics for every health problem

Taking an antibiotic for one health problem like a sinus infection may destroy the balance of healthy bacteria in your gut, causing the bad bugs to proliferate and trigger new problems like diarrhea that can vary from mildly annoying to life-threatening.

What’s more, you don’t have to take a drug to be exposed to antibiotic-related health problems. The overuse of antibiotics on food animal production has grown significantly, to the degree that some of these drugs have been used to treat human diseases, creating the opportunity for antibiotic-resistant infections.

The problem with overusing antibiotics has gotten so out of hand that the FDA has implemented a plan to phase out the use of some antibiotics used on farm animals to enhance their growth or improve feed efficiency.

The good news: Taking a probiotic, especially when you’ve been prescribed an antibiotic, can make all the difference in protecting the ideal balance of bacteria in your gut and your health.

Take a probiotic to maintain your body’s healthy bacterial balance

Taking a probiotic with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria, like EndoMune, is the easiest and safest way to maintain a healthy balance of bacteria for good gut health.

The best time to take a probiotic: A two-hour delay between taking an antibiotic and probiotic will reduce the risk of the former depleting the live, beneficial bacteria that protect your gut health.

Also avoid antibacterial soaps and other products (cosmetics, body washes and toothpaste) containing triclosan, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound linked to bacterial-resistance problems in Midwestern streams and rivers.

Share this post

Facebook
Twitter
Print
Email

More Articles

girl in pink shirt holding drawing of liver
Blog

Could Probiotics Reduce Fat in Your Liver?

The health of your microbiome may be critical in spotting the early signs of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFD), the most common form of chronic …

Digest this →
wooden spoon with real sugar on it
Blog

Real Sugar Disrupts Your Gut Health

We’ve warned you in the past about the growing number of ways too-sweet-for-their-own-good artificial sweeteners can harm your gut health. These outcomes may have been …

Digest this →