Free shipping on all orders over $125*
Synbiotic Blend of 10 Beneficial Strains, Developed by Board-Certified Gastroenterologist

digestive health

Could Probiotics Protect You From Microplastics?

Could Probiotics Protect You From Microplastics?

Summary: Harmful microplastics are everywhere and even in our bodies, but there may be a gut-friendly solution in probiotics.

Not a day goes by that we don’t hear something in the news about the growing challenges of plastics polluting our environment.

The problem has become so severe, a growing body of research has concluded that microplastics (pieces of plastic the size of a sesame seed) are even polluting our own bodies, from our lungs to our blood.
Where these microplastics come from is no surprise, given how much we rely on plastic for everything from tires to disposable water bottles. This passive exposure also infects the foods we grow and even the air we breathe.
The tiny microplastic particles can also be easily absorbed by the gut causing all sorts of problems with leaky gut and the healthy balance of bacteria in your gut, the center of your body’s immune system.

Probiotic protection

Fortunately, we may have a very natural way to protect our bodies and collective gut health from harm with help from probiotics, based on a recent review of studies appearing in Frontiers in Nutrition.
Researchers reviewed studies published from 2015-23 that showed how probiotics may ease inflammation and protect our bodies from some toxicity due to microplastic exposure.
Some studies showed how the beneficial bacteria contained in probiotics could absorb and neutralize heavy metals like mercury and cadmium. At the same time, some strains reduced problems by binding to and degrading phthalates (chemicals used to make plastics more durable) and BPA (a chemical used to produce polycarbonate plastics).

In a more recent study, Chinese scientists found that probiotic strains alleviated inflammation just enough to improve the quality of sperm in mice due to exposure to polystyrene microplastics (used to build appliances, electronics and many car parts).
For the foreseeable future, the persistence of microplastics is here to stay and research is just scraping the surface about the benefits of probiotics.
If you’re asking yourself what you could do to protect your body from the harmful effects of microplastics, it’s worth noting that some of the protective strains of beneficial bacteria examined in these studies are featured in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

Resources

Science News
Frontiers in Nutrition
Nutra Ingredients Europe
The Guardian
Environmental Health News
Nutrition Insight
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety

Could Probiotics Protect You From Microplastics? Read More »

Could Probiotics Protect You From COVID?

Could Probiotics Protect You From COVID?

Summary: Probiotics may provide extra protection to unvaccinated people after exposure to COVID to delay infections and reduce their symptoms.

Since the beginning of the COVID era, medical science has acknowledged the connection between this serious respiratory disease and a person’s gut health.
Often, gut dysbiosis — disruptions in the healthy balance of bacteria in your gut — have been the focal point in studies that link your health to COVID.
Not so long ago, we learned how probiotics can do a lot of good to alleviate common symptoms for patients already suffering from Long COVID.
The benefits of probiotics may also extend to people exposed to COVID who haven’t received a vaccine, according to findings recently published in Clinical Nutrition.

Protection before a vaccine

Recognizing how effective probiotics were in relieving respiratory infections, researchers at Duke University and the University of North Carolina launched a study prior to the widespread release of vaccines in 2020 to test the protective effective of probiotics on the unvaccinated who had been exposed to COVID.
Half of the 182 patients took a probiotic containing a proprietary strain of Lactobacillus while the rest received a placebo daily for four weeks.
No surprise, those who took a probiotic were 60 percent less likely to develop COVID symptoms even after exposure to the disease compared to those in the placebo group and were able to protect themselves from contracting COVID for a longer time.
And, probiotic patients had more significant remnants of beneficial bacteria in stool samples taken 70 and 85 days after the initial trial too.

Although the study’s sample size was small (due to the rapid development of vaccines), scientists were very encouraged about the results yet not surprised by them, says Dr. Paul Wischmeyer, co-lead author on the study.
“While limited in sample size, our study lends credence to the notion that our symbiotic microbes can be valuable partners in the fight against COVID-19 and potentially other future pandemic diseases.

So, if you’ve been lax about staying up-to-date on your COVID vaccine schedule — less than 20 percent have received updated vaccines according to the CDC — you may want to consider getting some extra protection by taking a probiotic like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic, formulated with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria and a prebiotic that feeds the beneficial bacteria in your gut.

Advisory note
For the most up-to-date advisories on COVID-19, visit the CDC website at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

Resources

Clinical Nutrition
Duke Health/News and Media
Washington Post

Could Probiotics Protect You From COVID? Read More »

PTSD, Your Diet and Your Gut

PTSD, Your Diet and Your Gut

Summary: The diet you follow and how your gut manages it may determine how you’ll experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

It’s hard to imagine a connection between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the human gut until you recognize how the gut-brain axis links your brain, gut and emotions.
Unfortunately, many of us only notice our gut-brain axis when those connections are disrupted by many factors, including poor diets that often lead to an array of gut-related health problems that drive inflammation.

The good news: Following a gut-healthy Mediterranean diet can do a lot of good to ease or even prevent PTSD-related symptoms, based on findings featured recently in Nature Mental Health.

Healthy eating for mental health

Researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston teamed up on the report that collected data on 191 women from the Nurses’ Health Study.
These women were assigned to three categories: Probable PTSD, trauma exposure but no PTSD and a control group with no trauma exposure. Patients were evaluated on everything from BMI, diet, age, mental health and PTSD symptoms to multiple stool samples.
When researchers compared the diets women consumed to the number of PTSD symptoms they experienced, that’s where the differences in mental health became very apparent.
Women who consumed standard Western diets high in red and processed meats experienced more PTSD challenges while others who followed healthier Mediterranean diets faced fewer symptoms.
What’s more, scientists identified a specific species of gut bacteria — Eubacterium eligens — whose abundance was positively associated with patients who experienced fewer PTSD problems and ate diets rich in the fruits, healthy fats, vegetables and fish that make up the standard Mediterranean diet.

The major takeaway from this study: If you are experiencing mental health challenges, working on your gut-brain axis connection by eating healthier meals with higher amounts of dietary fiber, incorporating more exercise in your daily routine and getting more sleep matters.
When you’re working long days and you don’t have the time to follow your healthier routines, give your gut some extra protection by taking a probiotic, ideally with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria and a prebiotic that feeds the good bugs in your gut, like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

References

Nature Mental Health
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
NBC News
Cleveland Clinic

PTSD, Your Diet and Your Gut Read More »

10 Beneficial Strains of EndoMune Advanced Probiotic

The 10 Beneficial Strains That Make Up EndoMune Advanced Probiotic

Summary: Learn more about the 10 beneficial strains of beneficial bacteria that make up EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

For a long time, we’ve talked about the many advantages a multi-strain probiotic like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic with  10 strains and 30 billion CFUs of beneficial bacteria (plus the awesome prebiotic FOS) contains in each capsule.

Some of you have been asking what those individual strains of beneficial bacteria can actually do for the health of your gut and body. What follows is a quick and easy-to-understand review of each powerful strain of beneficial bacteria featured in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

Bifidobacterium bifidum: Based on research, this bacterial strain may be helpful in treating certain kinds of diarrhea, infections related to H. pylori and relieving symptoms of IBS and constipation.
Bifidobacterium breve: This bacterial strain helps you fight nasty bugs that could cause health problems and also allows your body to absorb nutrients and break down food.
Bifidobacterium lactis: This bacterial strain promotes human health by aiding in absorbing minerals and vitamins and helping your microbiome rebound from antibiotic-associated diarrhea, upper respiratory tract infections and constipation. (This bacterial strain treats your fussy baby’s colic too!)
Bifidobacterium longum: One of the most common species in your gut while you are an infant, the amount of this bacterial strain lessens as you get older but it still does the hard work of working generating short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) like butyrate that lowers your gut’s pH levels and protects it from pathogenic bacteria.
Streptococcus thermophilus: This bacterial strain can help you better digest nutrients such as proteins and lipids as well as milk. (That’s why this bacterial strain is contained in some brands of yogurt.)
Lactobacillus acidophilus: One of the most studied probiotic strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus can be an effective way to treat diarrhea and help with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), high cholesterol, yeast infections, cold and flu symptoms, bacterial vaginosis and reducing eczema in young babies.
Lactobacillus casei: This bacterial species has been shown to display antimicrobial strength against antibiotic-resistant bacteria and protect the function of the intestinal epithelial cells that line the large and small intestines.
Lactobacillus plantarum: Besides increasing the diversity of flora in your gut, this bacterial strain may support the health of your brain and heart and improve your body’s absorption of iron.
Lactobacillus rhamnosus: In addition to treating diarrhea and promoting the growth of beneficial bacteria in your gut, this bacterial species may help in preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs) and even cavities.
Lactococcus lactis: Along with improving how you digest food, this strain of beneficial bacteria may also lessen your risk of serious health problems including diabetes and cancer and reduce your stress levels.

Resources
https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-health-benefits-of-bifobacterium-4684233
https://www.healthline.com/health/bifidobacterium-bifidum
https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1666/bifidobacterium-bifidum
https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1665/bifidobacterium-breve
Bifidobacterium lactis

Bifidobacterium longum

Streptococcus thermophilus
Streptococcus thermophilus: A Surprisingly Warm Probiotic


Lactobacillus
https://www.verywellhealth.com/acidophilus-and-other-probiotics-88321
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9668099/
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/lactobacillus-acidophilus#TOC_TITLE_HDR_7
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/lactobacillus-rhamnosus#_noHeaderPrefixedContent
https://www.healthline.com/health/digestive-health/lactobacillus-casei
https://www.optibacprobiotics.com/professionals/probiotics-database/lactobacillus/lactobacillus-casei
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intestinal_epithelium
https://www.optibacprobiotics.com/professionals/probiotics-database/lactobacillus/lactobacillus-plantarum
Exploring the Lactobacillus Plantarum Benefits from Probiotics

https://atlasbiomed.com/blog/top-12-lactobacillus-probiotics/#rhamnosus-gg
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/lactobacillus-rhamnosus

Lactococcus lactis
https://www.digicomply.com/dietary-supplements-database/lactococcus-lactis

The 10 Beneficial Strains That Make Up EndoMune Advanced Probiotic Read More »

Scroll to Top