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Synbiotic Blend of 10 Beneficial Strains, Developed by Board-Certified Gastroenterologist

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10 Beneficial Strains of EndoMune Advanced Probiotic

The 10 Beneficial Strains That Make Up EndoMune Advanced Probiotic

Summary: Learn more about the 10 beneficial strains of beneficial bacteria that make up EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

For a long time, we’ve talked about the many advantages a multi-strain probiotic like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic with  10 strains and 30 billion CFUs of beneficial bacteria (plus the awesome prebiotic FOS) contains in each capsule.

Some of you have been asking what those individual strains of beneficial bacteria can actually do for the health of your gut and body. What follows is a quick and easy-to-understand review of each powerful strain of beneficial bacteria featured in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

Bifidobacterium bifidum: Based on research, this bacterial strain may be helpful in treating certain kinds of diarrhea, infections related to H. pylori and relieving symptoms of IBS and constipation.
Bifidobacterium breve: This bacterial strain helps you fight nasty bugs that could cause health problems and also allows your body to absorb nutrients and break down food.
Bifidobacterium lactis: This bacterial strain promotes human health by aiding in absorbing minerals and vitamins and helping your microbiome rebound from antibiotic-associated diarrhea, upper respiratory tract infections and constipation. (This bacterial strain treats your fussy baby’s colic too!)
Bifidobacterium longum: One of the most common species in your gut while you are an infant, the amount of this bacterial strain lessens as you get older but it still does the hard work of working generating short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) like butyrate that lowers your gut’s pH levels and protects it from pathogenic bacteria.
Streptococcus thermophilus: This bacterial strain can help you better digest nutrients such as proteins and lipids as well as milk. (That’s why this bacterial strain is contained in some brands of yogurt.)
Lactobacillus acidophilus: One of the most studied probiotic strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus can be an effective way to treat diarrhea and help with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), high cholesterol, yeast infections, cold and flu symptoms, bacterial vaginosis and reducing eczema in young babies.
Lactobacillus casei: This bacterial species has been shown to display antimicrobial strength against antibiotic-resistant bacteria and protect the function of the intestinal epithelial cells that line the large and small intestines.
Lactobacillus plantarum: Besides increasing the diversity of flora in your gut, this bacterial strain may support the health of your brain and heart and improve your body’s absorption of iron.
Lactobacillus rhamnosus: In addition to treating diarrhea and promoting the growth of beneficial bacteria in your gut, this bacterial species may help in preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs) and even cavities.
Lactococcus lactis: Along with improving how you digest food, this strain of beneficial bacteria may also lessen your risk of serious health problems including diabetes and cancer and reduce your stress levels.

Resources
https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-health-benefits-of-bifobacterium-4684233
https://www.healthline.com/health/bifidobacterium-bifidum
https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1666/bifidobacterium-bifidum
https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1665/bifidobacterium-breve
Bifidobacterium lactis

Bifidobacterium longum

Streptococcus thermophilus
Streptococcus thermophilus: A Surprisingly Warm Probiotic


Lactobacillus
https://www.verywellhealth.com/acidophilus-and-other-probiotics-88321
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9668099/
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/lactobacillus-acidophilus#TOC_TITLE_HDR_7
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/lactobacillus-rhamnosus#_noHeaderPrefixedContent
https://www.healthline.com/health/digestive-health/lactobacillus-casei
https://www.optibacprobiotics.com/professionals/probiotics-database/lactobacillus/lactobacillus-casei
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intestinal_epithelium
https://www.optibacprobiotics.com/professionals/probiotics-database/lactobacillus/lactobacillus-plantarum
Exploring the Lactobacillus Plantarum Benefits from Probiotics

https://atlasbiomed.com/blog/top-12-lactobacillus-probiotics/#rhamnosus-gg
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/lactobacillus-rhamnosus

Lactococcus lactis
https://www.digicomply.com/dietary-supplements-database/lactococcus-lactis

The 10 Beneficial Strains That Make Up EndoMune Advanced Probiotic Read More »

Safe to use Probiotics to help treat type 2 diabetes.

Probiotics: An Effective Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes?

Summary: Is it safe and helpful to take a probiotic if you’re coping with type 2 diabetes? This survey of studies gives a thumbs-up to probiotics!

As the epidemic of metabolic syndrome continues in America — thanks to a Western lifestyle that can kill you faster than smoking — the number of Americans dealing with type 2 diabetes is growing by the day.

Among the 38 million Americans who currently suffer from diabetes, roughly 90 percent of them are dealing with type 2 diabetes. (An alarming 22 percent don’t even know they have diabetes at all!)

You can do plenty of things to manage your health if you have type 2 diabetes, from diversifying your diet to include more unprocessed whole foods to finding more time during day to get moving with some form of exercise.

Researchers have also learned so much about how an unbalanced gut microbiome affects many aspects of human health, including how it creates many challenges for type 2 diabetes patients trying to regulate their blood sugar.

If you or a loved one is struggling with managing type 2 diabetes, taking a probiotic should be at the top of your to-do list too, based on a recent review of 33 studies appearing in Nutrients.

Nearly two-thirds of the studies Canadian researchers reviewed reported improvements in at least one measurement related to glycemic levels while taking a probiotic.

In addition, nearly half of those reports cited improvements in lipid levels after taking a probiotic. That’s very important given that elevated levels of LDL lipoproteins can greatly raise one’s risks of cardiovascular diseases.

Also, the benefits of multi-strain probiotics formulated with strains from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families really stuck out with 16 studies reporting improvements in at least one glycemic measurement.

This makes sense given that the Bifidobacterium family enhances the production of healthy fatty acids and the digestion of fiber while promoting immune health and the Lactobacillus family assists the protection of the barrier lining the gut.

Finally, probiotics also worked very well with metformin, a go-to drug prescribed for type 2 diabetics, enriching the composition of gut bacteria, decreasing insulin resistance and increasing the abundance of beneficial short chain fatty acids (SCFAs).

While there’s much more research to be done, there’s little doubt that probiotics, especially those formulated with multiple strains of bacteria like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic, can be a boon to the health of type 2 diabetes patients.

Resources
Nutrients
News-Medical.net/Life Sciences
CDC
Mayo Clinic
Medline Plus

Probiotics: An Effective Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes? Read More »

Women: Are You Protecting Your Gut-Brain Axis?

Women: Are You Protecting Your Gut-Brain Axis?

  A healthy and balanced gut microbiome keeps a woman’s gut-brain axis working smoothly and makes a world of difference to her emotional health. Women: are you protecting your gut-brain axis?   Not so long ago, science debated the existence of the gut-brain axis, the connection that links your gut, emotions and brain.   That changed once modern medicine proved that as much as 90 percent of the serotonin (a chemical that governs your emotions) your body produces comes from your gut and specific bacteria play key roles in making it.   Your ability to generate the amount of serotonin your body that keeps your gut-brain axis working as it should and your emotions on an even keel depends on the healthy diversity of bacteria in your gut.   This balance or imbalance of gut bacteria concerning emotional health was the chief finding in a recent study appearing in Psychological Medicine.  

The Study

  In the first phase of research, scientists from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard surveyed more than 200 middle-aged women about their feeling over the past 30 days, asking them to report positive and negative emotions along with how well they handled them.   Three months later, women provided stool samples that were analyzed in ways that enabled researchers to find patterns in human health and how their emotions influenced them.   No surprise, women who suppressed their emotions had less diverse gut microbiomes and higher levels of bad bacteria while those who reported happier feelings had lower levels of those specific species.   “This was what you would expect, but it was kind of amazing that we saw it,” says Dr. Laura Kubzansky, a professor in the Chan School’s department of behavioral science at Harvard.  

The Solution

  There’s a lot a woman can do to give her gut-brain axis a gentle reset in a good direction, starting with making lifestyle changes. For example, eating healthier meals including foods rich in dietary fiber is a great start.   When life gets in the way and you’re on the go, here’s an additional step you should consider: Take a probiotic formulated with multiple strains of lab-tested beneficial bacteria and a prebiotic that feeds the good bacteria in your gut.   If you’re looking for a probiotic that will protect the healthy balance of bacteria in your gut and strengthens the connections in your gut-brain axis, consider the proprietary blend of 10 strains from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families plus a proven probiotic (FOS) in each daily dose of EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.  

References

  Psychological Medicine   Brigham and Women’s Hospital   The Harvard Gazette    

Women: Are You Protecting Your Gut-Brain Axis? Read More »

8 steps to protect yourself from the flu

8 Easy Steps to Protect Yourself From The Flu

8 Easy Steps to Protect Yourself From The Flu

  Are you far from ready for the 2023-24 flu season? These easy-to-follow steps can go a long, long way to protect you.   With the extreme heat of the summer finally fading away and the kids getting back to school, the CDC has already begun its annual campaign of dos and don’ts for the 2023-24 flu season.   That’s no surprise, considering last year’s unique “tripledemic” problems with the flu, RSV and the recent strains of COVID-19. What’s more, we may experience an earlier-than-usual flu season that may peak sooner just like last year, according to experts at Johns Hopkins.   The good news: Many of you are more prepared than usual, and have already scheduled appointments to get vaccinated for the flu, COVID-19 and RSV.   But keeping current on vaccines alone won’t protect you and your family entirely from the flu or any other respiratory virus. Fortunately, there’s a lot more you can do to protect your health from the flu. Here are 8 steps that can help you do just that!  

Follow these 8 steps to protect your family from the flu

 
  1. Avoid close contact with people who are sick. (Do your part to protect your loved ones if you’re sick by keeping your distance too.)
  2. Wash your hands often with plain soap and water thoroughly for at least 20 seconds. (When you can’t access soap and water, use a hand sanitizer formulated with at least 70 percent isopropyl alcohol.)
  3. Do your best to keep surfaces at work and home as clean as you can. (The flu virus can live on hard surfaces for a long while, according to the Mayo Clinic.)
  4. Get the right amount of sleep you need every night. (Sleep is one of the easiest and best things you can do to stay healthy!)
  5. Don’t even think about asking your family doctor for an antibiotic to treat a case of the flu. (It’s completely unnecessary if you follow these steps.)
  6. Drink plenty of water. (Don’t overdo it with caffeine-heavy drinks like coffee, carbonated beverages and energy drinks.)
  7. Keep moving by incorporating some form of exercise in your daily routine. (Even walking makes a difference!)
  8. Pay close attention to your emotions and stress levels, and give yourself the gift of free time every day. (Stepping away from the world for just 30 minutes of peace and quiet helps.)
  All of these simple steps also serve one very important purpose: Protecting the health of your gut, the center of your immune system. We also know that life can get in the way of the best-laid plans, especially during the busy fall and winter months when the flu and other bugs are swimming around us. That’s why we remind you to take a probiotic, ideally containing multiple strains of proven, beneficial bacteria along with a prebiotic that feeds the good bacteria in your gut like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.  

   

Resources

AARP Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health CDC Cleveland Clinic      

8 Easy Steps to Protect Yourself From The Flu Read More »

Ozempic and Wegovy: Are New Weight Loss Drugs Really Safe?

Ozempic and Wegovy: Are New Weight Loss Drugs Really Safe?

  Summary: Recent reports about the safety of Ozempic and Wegovy, injectable drugs prescribed by doctors to help you lose weight, should make you think long and hard about using them.   You’ve probably heard a lot recently about a pair of blockbuster drugs — Wegovy and Ozempic (semaglutide) — for their effectiveness in helping people lose A LOT of weight.   Obesity affects so many Americans — more than 40 percent are obese according to the CDC — that people will try almost anything to lose weight.   Taking weekly injections of Wegovy or Ozempic work to slow down the emptying of the stomach and decrease one’s appetite, and could help someone drop about 12 percent of their body weight.   If these results sound almost too good to be true, the unfortunate reality for some patients has been heartbreaking and life-threatening.  

The Problems with Semaglutide

  According to reports received by the FDA, the most serious problems are associated with severe gastroparesis, also known as stomach paralysis. And, in one case reported by CNN, a woman suffered from severe gastroparesis along with nausea and cyclic vomiting syndrome (characterized by episodes of severe vomiting that can last for hours or days).   What’s more, the American Society of Anesthesiologists recently issued a warning urging patients to cease taking these medications up to a week before surgery. Their concern: A slower emptying of the stomach could allow patients to regurgitate and aspirate food into their airways and lungs when they’re sedated, even after fasting.   Even if you don’t have an extreme version of those kinds of problems, the most common side effects of Wegovy are nausea (44 percent of all users), diarrhea (30 percent) and vomiting and constipation (24 percent).   Also, for either of these drugs to work as directed, you must take them weekly to keep the weight off, or those extra pounds will come back quickly.  

Are Weight Loss Drugs the Only Answer to Effective Weight Loss?

  Did you know there’s a better, safer way to slow down your appetite, eat less and lose weight without the expense or common side effects of an injectable drug like Wegovy or Ozempic?   You may want to give your weight-loss journey a fresh start with the help of EndoMune Metabolic Rescue that contains 1 billion CFUs of beneficial Bifidobacterium lactis and 600 mg of the prebiotic XOS.   XOS is a proven prebiotic that spurs the production of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that trigger some of the same mechanisms Wegovy does to slow down the movement of food from your stomach and create a feeling of fullness naturally.    

Resources

  CNN Health   UC Health   Healthline   CBS News   CDC   Drugs.com    

Ozempic and Wegovy: Are New Weight Loss Drugs Really Safe? Read More »

Image of stevia package with text: Is Stevia really a gut-safe sweetener?

Is Stevia Really a “Gut-Safe” Sweetener?

Is Stevia Really a “Gut-Safe” Sweetener?

Have you been wondering, as many people have, if stevia is really a “gut-safe” sweetener?  Whether it’s artificial sweeteners or sugar, both create problems with the gut by blocking proteins that help you maintain a healthy weight or altering the healthy composition of your gut bacteria. As concerns about real sugar and artificial sweeteners have grown, many have considered stevia, a sweetener derived from the leaves of the Stevia rebaudiana plant.  Stevia is marketed by manufacturers as a natural sweetener, although it’s processed or combined with other ingredients to create a sweetener and, just like artificial sweeteners, it contains no calories. But, it is up to 400 times sweeter than table sugar.   Some experts believe stevia is a better choice for your overall health, and recommend that you use it as you would table sugar. However, before adding stevia to your grocery list, it’s important to ask yourself if stevia really is a gut-safe sweetener.   The answer will surprise you…   

A Disruptive Presence

Despite very different approaches, a pair of research teams from Israel in separate studies came to very similar conclusions that stevia may have a disruptive effect on the gut.  In a 2021 study featured in the journal Molecules, scientists at Ben Gurion University studied the effect of stevia extracts (steviol, Reb A and Stevioside) when they come in contact with a strain derived from harmful E. Coli bacteria with an emphasis on digesting food   In this case, the use of stevia disrupted the healthy microbial balance by delaying how gut bacteria communicate in the microbiome, which can often lead to problems with gas, constipation, stomach pains and other gut-related issues.  These disruptions were far more evident in a very recent study conducted by the Weizmann Institute of Science that compared the gut health of patients consuming three artificial sweeteners (saccharin, sucralose and aspartame) or stevia far below suggested “normal” levels for two weeks.  During that short interval of time, any sugar substitute used — stevia or artificial sweeteners — altered the composition of gut bacteria very differently and they were related to a patient’s impaired glucose tolerance.   

The Take-Home Message

 Despite the not-great news about stevia and other zero-calorie sweeteners, you do have lots of options at your disposal to protect your microbiome and keep the pounds off.  And, you can act right now to protect your gut microbiome by taking these steps. 
  1. Stay hydrated with clean fresh water. (A healthy tip: Add lemon slices along with a dash of cinnamon or turmeric to your water for extra flavor.)
  2. Moderation, moderation and moderation. Pay attention to what you’re eating or drinking and how your body feels afterward (even if it tastes great).
  3. Read the Nutrition Facts labels displayed on any processed foods you eat for signs of added sugars. You’ll be surprised about how many added sugars are used to produce processed foods. (Brands of flavored yogurt labelled as low-fat may contain as much as 33 grams of sugar per serving!)
  4. Protect the bacteria in your gut so they keep working as they should behind the scenes by taking a probiotic with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria.
If you’ve been looking for a proven probiotic, ideally formulated with beneficial bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families, consider the proprietary blend of 10 strains plus a proven probiotic (FOS) in each daily dose of EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.  EndoMune is built to protect your microbiome and keep it communicating, even in the presence of a “natural” sweetener like stevia.   And, if you need some extra help to get started on your weight loss journey, consider EndoMune Metabolic Rescue, a probiotic uniquely formulated with Bifidobacterium lactis and the prebiotic XOS that promotes a sense of fullness in addition to protecting the health of your gut.   

References 

   

Is Stevia Really a “Gut-Safe” Sweetener? Read More »

Woman bringing yellow suitcase through airport.

Don’t Let Traveler’s Diarrhea Ruin Your Vacation

Don’t Let Traveler’s Diarrhea Ruin Your Vacation You know what time of year it is… You’ve been planning and saving a long time for that special vacation of a lifetime with your family. Now that the planning is over and the trip is nearly here, you may still be wondering if you’ve covered all of the bases. Is your vacation taking you to a warmer, international destination thousands of miles and several time zones away (even on a cruise)? If so, you will want to take steps to avoid a run-in with traveler’s diarrhea, the most common and predictable illness travelers face. Consuming contaminated foods and liquids are the main culprits of traveler’s diarrhea. Depending on what time of year, where people travel and the precautions you may or may not take, as many as 70 percent of you could be dealing with traveler’s diarrhea. So, why is traveler’s diarrhea so troublesome and harmful to your health?   The Persistent, Harmful Cause Of Traveler’s Diarrhea Researchers at Boston University and Umea University in Sweden have studied Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) or ETEC, the leading cause of traveler’s diarrhea, in hopes of finding ways to eliminate the bad bacteria without harming the good bacteria in a patient’s gut. Under the microscope, scientists got one step closer to understanding how ETEC can do so much harm. Using long thick filaments (also known as pili), ETEC cells bind themselves to cells in the gut through a process of winding and unwinding to help them hang around in your body and make you sick. This winding/unwinding of filaments also allows ETEC cells to adjust to their particular microenvironments (the urinary tract or gut) and keep them in place. Now that scientists better understand how ETEC works, their next task is determining how to get rid of them, a process that has taken nearly two decades in the laboratory just to get this far… Preventing Traveler’s Diarrhea Rather than wait around a whole lot longer for a possible “cure” for traveler’s diarrhea, here’s some easy steps you can take right to reduce your risks of illness on the road:
  • Maintain good hygiene with plain soap and water (avoid antibacterial soaps).
  • Don’t ask your doctor to prescribe an antibiotic to prevent traveler’s diarrhea, because it could do far more harm than good.
  • Know where your sources of water are coming from and avoid drinking unsterilized water. (Bottled water is your best friend!)
  • Take a probiotic, ideally with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria, like those building block strains from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families contained in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.
  Resources Structure The Brink/Boston University Cleveland Clinic CDC

Don’t Let Traveler’s Diarrhea Ruin Your Vacation Read More »

Woman laying in bed unable to sleep with her hand over her head. Text reads "Sleep Challenges: Sarcopenia & your gut"

Sleep Challenges, Sarcopenia and Your Gut

Sleep Challenges, Sarcopenia and Your Gut

We never get tired of reminding you how much a good night’s sleep can do for your health as a natural way to reboot your body, a lot like your home computer, to repair and restore itself after the stresses of the day. Staying up too late, following a work schedule that includes 24/7 shift duty or traveling across multiple time zones not only disrupts your body’s natural circadian clock, but it takes away valuable time your body needs to replenish itself. Over time, these sleep deficits can harm you significantly, leaving you more vulnerable to the cluster of health problems better known as metabolic syndrome. As you know, the gut plays a major role in your sleep too, and even short-term, drastic changes can harm the balance of gut bacteria you need to maintain good health. Sleep problems and gut disruptions may also play a key role in worsening sarcopenia, the age-related and progressive loss of strength and muscle mass that often contributes to functional declines especially among seniors, according to a study appearing in the journal Sleep.

Analyzing The Data

A group of European researchers based these conclusions about the links between sarcopenia, gut imbalances and poor sleep based on an analysis of 11 clinical studies conducted with health patients ranging in age from 4-71. In many ways, sleep problems and gut health issues go hand-in-hand in creating an environment in which sarcopenia emerges as one more serious health challenge. At the gut level, sleep problems influence an unhealthy balance of gut bacteria that also reduces the structural integrity and functionality of the wall of the gut (which could lead to leaky gut problems). Bad sleep may also be a trigger for imbalances in gut bacteria that can also create the production of pro-inflammatory chemicals. Even one sleepless night creates an environment that favors anabolic resistance and muscle breakdown.

Muscle Growth and Your Gut

We know this initial review of studies is a toe in the water when it comes to understanding the collision of gut bacteria imbalances, poor sleep and sarcopenia, yet there’s no denying the link between muscles and good gut health is a real one. Interestingly, another recent review of studies published in the Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle found a very gut-healthy way to improve muscle mass and muscle strength with the help of probiotics. In fact, researchers noted significant improvements in global muscle strength among adults older than age 50 after taking a probiotic for at least 12 weeks. Also, among the strains of beneficial bacteria cited in this report included several featured in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic. There’s still a lot we don’t know about the connections between muscle growth and the gut, but we do know how a healthy gut and a good night’s sleep work hand-in-hand to give your overall health a major boost. If you need some help improving your sleep hygiene, check out our Sleep 101 article that includes many common-sense steps you can implement today to help your health and your gut too!  

Resources

Sleep Nutra Ingredients USA Cleveland Clinic Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle

Sleep Challenges, Sarcopenia and Your Gut Read More »

Simple graphic depicting a bottle of antibiotics surrounded by different colored illustrations of bacteria. Text says: "Why take probiotics with an antibiotic"

Why Take Probiotics With An Antibiotic

Why Take Probiotics With An Antibiotic

We spend a lot of time talking about antibiotics in this space for good reasons.

Once upon a time, antibiotics were considered “miracle” drugs and were prescribed for all kinds of reasons. Many of these uses were justified (strep throat was a fatal disease before antibiotics) but now these drugs are being prescribed for viral infections (common colds and the flu) that often create more health problems than solutions.

It’s hard to dispute how often antibiotics are prescribed inappropriately, based on the recent findings of an Oregon State University report on outpatient visits to health care providers.

In that Oregon State report, roughly 25 percent of the antibiotics were prescribed for the wrong reason and an additional 18 percent were prescribed for no reason at all, amounting to an alarming 56 million prescriptions during the study period.

Unfortunately, this unnecessary overuse of antibiotics coupled with our daily exposure to antimicrobial chemicals has created an environment in which these drugs often don’t work as they should or not at all.

At times in your life, you will need to take an antibiotic to resolve a health problem. That’s a given.

The number one piece of advice we consistently recommend: Take a probiotic, ideally one with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic, to protect your gut, the center of your body’s immune system.

Although previous reports have cited probiotic benefits in reducing gut-related side effects when taking an antibiotic, some still question whether probiotics taken in conjunction with antibiotics protect the healthy composition and diversity of a patient’s microbiome.

However, a recent paper appearing in the Journal of Medical Microbiology confirms what we’ve been saying for a very long time.

 

The Probiotic Benefits

Researchers from TCU, the University of Texas and Mexico conducted a systematic review of 29 studies published over the past seven years related to how probiotics work alongside antibiotics.

Overall, the report concluded taking a probiotic with an antibiotic lessens or prevents changes to the composition of microbiomes, protects the diversity of species in the gut and even restores friendly bacterial species like Faecalibacterium prausnitzii that reduce inflammation.

When antibiotic treatments were combined with probiotics, the majority of those changes in gut bacteria were less pronounced and some were even prevented, says study co-author Dr. Elisa Marroquin, an assistant professor at TCU.

In fact, Dr. Morroquin says there is no good reason not to take a probiotic when antibiotics are prescribed.

Based on our antibiotic protocol (check out our Antibiotic 101 article), we suggest taking a probiotic like EndoMune about two hours before the prescribed antibiotic to give your microbiome time for those beneficial bacteria to reach your gut and protect your immune health.

 

Resources

Journal of Medical Microbiology

Microbiology Society

Medical News Today

Oregon State University

Why Take Probiotics With An Antibiotic Read More »

Graphic depicting the digestive system. Text reads "The Probiotic Benefit for Gastric Bypass Patients"

The Probiotic Benefit For Gastric Bypass Patients

The Probiotic Benefit For Gastric Bypass Patients

With greater numbers of people struggling with a myriad of health issues surrounding obesity, the popularity of gastric bypass procedures that help patients shed extra pounds has grown exponentially over the past three decades.

Although gastric bypass isn’t for everyone who suffers from severe weight-related health problems, this procedure can be an important catalyst toward better health outcomes.

Losing the weight with the help of gastric bypass is merely the first step. It takes a great deal of work and mental determination to follow a healthier diet plan rather than a nutrient-poor Western diet which is often the reason many patients consider gastric bypass in the first place.

However, taking a probiotic formulated with Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains may be a very safe, gut-friendly solution that eases some of the issues gastric bypass patients face, according to a recent study.

 

The Gut-Brain Connection At Work

A team of Brazilian researchers conducted a clinical trial with 101 gastric bypass patients to assess the gut-brain benefits of prescribing a probiotic containing Bifidobacterium lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus, targeting symptoms of binge eating and food addictions.

(These strains of beneficial bacteria are among the 10 formulated in every bottle of EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.)

Patients received a multi-strain probiotic or placebo for three months, starting seven days after their gastric bypass surgeries, then were evaluated at the 90-day and 1-year marks to assess outcomes.

Both patient groups experienced decreases in symptoms at three months. But, the real benefit of taking a multi-strain probiotic showed up a year later as patients still experienced significant gut-brain relief from binging and food addictions.

 

What If Gastric Bypass Isn’t An Option?

For many people, gastric bypass may not be the best option to lose weight. You may not be keen on weight-loss surgery, especially if the amount of weight you need to lose is a much more manageable number that can be aided by eating nutrient-dense foods and increasing your exercise.

If you want to lose weight safely and more slowly but need some extra help, you may want to consider EndoMune Metabolic Rescue, a probiotic that can help you maintain the healthy balance of bacteria in your gut and jumpstart your weight loss plan.

EndoMune Metabolic Rescue contains a proven blend of Bifidobacterium lactis and the prebiotic XOS (Xylooligosaccharides) that stimulates the release of hormones in your gut that reduce your appetite naturally by promoting a greater sense of fullness.

If gastric bypass isn’t in your future, it’s good to know you have gut-healthy options in the EndoMune family of probiotics that can make your weight-loss journey a good experience.

 

References

ABCD (Arquivos Brasileiros de Cirurgia Digestiva)

Nutra Ingredients

Mayo Clinic

Porto Biomedical Journal

Medline Plus

The Probiotic Benefit For Gastric Bypass Patients Read More »

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