gut health

Face mask with text: Your coronavirus mask protocol. When to Wear A Mask

Your Coronavirus Mask Protocol

For most Americans, the beginning of Spring now marks the one-year “anniversary” of the World Health Organization declaring the coronavirus/COVID-19 a global pandemic and the huge shakeup on how we conducted our daily lives.

Not too long ago, wearing a mask that covered our faces and noses during a quick trip to the grocery store was unimaginable, but became very necessary to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

With new coronavirus cases and deaths on the decline in the nation, a number of states have eased some indoor restrictions for restaurants, shops and schools and, in some cases, lifted them entirely.

Depending on where you live, states are likely to leave the enforcement of coronavirus mandates to cities, counties and businesses to make the best decisions for their citizens, employees, and consumers.

And, in those localities, the decision to wear a mask or not remains largely up to you.

What should you do?

Despite the lifting of mandates at the state and local level, many businesses, offices and schools still require workers, students, patients, teachers and shoppers to wear masks.

That’s a good thing because it’s important NOT to let your guard down when we’re trying to get past the coronavirus and restore some normality in our lives.

Wearing a mask can be very important if you’re older, or have conditions like COPD, cancer and the cluster of symptoms that make up metabolic syndrome that worsen coronavirus symptoms.

In fact, wearing masks during this post-coronavirus era is a good addition to the steps we’ve recommended previously to protect you and your family’s health during the flu season.

  • Protect the center of your immune system — your gut — by taking a probiotic composed of multiple strains of beneficial bacteria like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.
  • Maintain good hygiene by washing your hands often with soap and water.
  • Set aside a few minutes each day for a little exercise.
  • Create a workable sleep schedule and stick to it.
  • Make sure you’re eating a more diverse diet full of whole foods that are low in sugar and higher in dietary fiber.

Even as a trio of coronavirus vaccines circulate across America, keeping your immune system strong should be the center of your personal strategy to stay healthy.

For now, wearing a mask, in addition to following this simple immune system checklist, will do so much good to help us move past the coronavirus and get back to living the social parts of our lives with our loved ones nearby and far away.

 

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Text over coffee mug: Is Stevia Really A "Gut-Safe" Sugar?

Is Stevia Really a “Gut-Safe” Sugar?

For a long time, people have been looking for ways to satisfy their sweet tooth cravings without having to sacrifice their waistlines or gut health for it. The real refined sugar contained in most processed foods that populate Western diets (including ones you’d never imagine) is a big no and the same applies for artificial sweeteners.

Whether it’s real sugar or the artificial sweeteners, both can create problems with the gut, either by blocking proteins that help you maintain a healthy weight or changing the composition of your gut bacteria for the worse.

With the reputation of real sugar and artificial sweeteners on the wane, a lot of you may have considered stevia, a sweetener derived from the leaves of the Stevia rebaudiana plant that contains nearly no calories.

Like many food products, stevia is marketed by manufacturers as a natural one, even though it’s actually processed or combined with other ingredients to create a sweetener.

But is stevia really good for your gut?

An unbalanced answer

Considering its emerging popularity, scientists at Ben Gurion University in Israel studied the effect of stevia extracts (steviol, Reb A and stevioside) in the lab on a strain derived from the harmful E. coli bacteria with an emphasis on digesting food.

Like other sweeteners, however, stevia created problems, but not by tipping the balance of good versus bad bacteria in the gut as one might assume.

Instead, stevia had the effect of disrupting the communication between bacteria in the gut, which could explain why some people experience constipation, gas or stomach pain after using it in their coffee or in making foods.

This study serves as an initial analysis that shows more work needs to be done “before the food industry replaces sugar and artificial sweeteners with stevia,” says lead researcher Dr. Karina Golberg.

The take-home message

Don’t be too concerned that there’s no “safe” sweetener you can use that will help you in your quest to protect your gut health and keep the pounds off. Here are simple steps you can take that can make a difference today.

  1. Stay hydrated with clean fresh water. (A healthy tip: Add lemon slices along with a dash of cinnamon or turmeric to your water for extra flavor.)
  2. Moderation, moderation and moderation. Pay attention to what you’re eating or drinking and how your body feels afterward (even if tastes great).
  3. Read the Nutrition Facts displayed on the labels of any processed foods you eat for signs of added sugars.
  4. Protect the bacteria in your gut so they keep working as they should behind the scenes by taking a probiotic formulated with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria.

EndoMune Advanced Probiotic is formulated with a proprietary blend of 10 bacterial strains plus a proven prebiotic (FOS) that can keep the microbiome communicating even in the presence of a “natural” sweetener like stevia.

References

Bad diet or bad genes

The Gut or Your Genes: What Affects Your Health More?

We’re pretty sure you’ve heard the same old phrase, You are what you eat! way too many times to count.

Nevertheless, there’s a certain amount of logic to this saying, given that eating poorly has been proven to kill you faster than smoking or even a serious car accident!

Plus, the three leading causes of deaths associated with inadequate diets — cardiovascular disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes — can be largely preventable with the right amount of attention to your health.

There’s no question the quality and kinds of foods you eat also affects the healthy balance of bacteria in your gut very directly… but just how much?

Would you think twice about eating a nutrient-dense diet more often and processed foods a little less often if you knew doing so had a more powerful effect on your overall health than your genes?

Nutrition matters

The foundation upon which this international study of nearly 1,100 patients conducted in the U.S. and Europe was built is one we’ve talked about for a long time.

The quality of the diet you eat every day directly affects your gut, leaving you more or less vulnerable to health problems.

Patients who ate a diverse diet full of minimally-processed, nutrient-rich foods had healthy microbiomes, while those consuming unhealthier diets chock full of processed foods, juices, and refined grains had microbiomes full of harmful bacteria.

That’s not new.

What is new: Scientists identified specific bacterial strains associated with affecting a patient’s risks of health problems like heart disease, obesity, and heart disease, both good and bad.

For example, the presence of the species Blastocytis was associated with maintaining healthy blood sugar levels after meals, certainly a good thing.

What’s more, scientists linked these bacteria to specific food groups, nutrients, and diets, which explains why they concluded that what you eat may have a more significant impact on the gut and your health than your genes.

“Given the highly personalized composition of each individuals’ microbiome, our research suggests that we may be able to modify our gut microbiome to optimize our health by choosing the best foods for our unique biology,” says Dr. Sarah Berry of King’s College London.

In fact, some of these microbiome-based biomarkers for cardiovascular disease, impaired glucose intolerance, and obesity identified by scientists are also key risk factors for the coronavirus.

Protect the health of your gut

The important lesson — taking ownership by eating more nutritious meals consistently and cutting back on highly processed foods for the health of your gut — appears much more evident now than ever.

Your genes may not have the influence experts once assumed, but that’s an empowering thing. Now, you’re in the driver’s seat to make the changes you need, starting with protecting and improving the healthy balance of bacteria in your gut.

In addition to eating more nutritious meals made of whole foods, a probiotic, ideally formulated with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria, can be a great, natural tool to help you re-establish your gut’s healthy balance too.

The ten proven strains of beneficial bacteria in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic can make a huge difference in balancing your gut microbiome and help you protect your health naturally.

 

Resources

 

 

take a probiotic during coronavirus pandemic

Could Your Unbalanced Gut Worsen the Coronavirus?

Since the beginning of the pandemic, we’ve reminded you about some simple steps you should be taking to protect the health of your gut during these coronavirus times. Many things affect your gut microbiome’s balance, from the meals you eat every day to the sleep you get every night. All of these things determine how well your immune system functions.

That critical balance — or the lack of it — and the volume of bacteria in your gut may play a critical role not only in how severe your battle with the novel coronavirus may be, but also in how your immune system responds to it.

The lack of gut bacteria balance

A team of Chinese researchers studied how the gut influences the novel coronavirus’s severity by comparing stool and blood samples from 100 hospitalized patients with a coronavirus diagnosis to 78 healthy patients who took part in a microbiome study before the pandemic began.

Among those coronavirus patients, 41 provided multiple stool samples while hospital-bound, and 27 shared stool samples up to 30 days after they recovered. The gut microbiome differences between healthy patients and those who fought COVID-19 were pretty dramatic.

Accounting for the lack of balance, researchers determined the guts of novel coronavirus patients contained fewer beneficial strains of bacteria that triggered an immune system response.

Also, lower numbers of some gut bacteria, including Bifidobacterium bifidum, were linked to more severe coronavirus infections after taking into account patients’ age and their use of antibiotics.

(Bifidobacterium bifidum is one of 10 strains that make up the potent mix of beneficial  bacteria in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.)

What’s more, this depletion of bacteria was measured in samples up to 30 days after patients recovered.

The imbalances show up in the blood too!

When COVID-19 infects the human body, the immune system can sometimes go into overdrive, producing inflammatory chemicals called cytokines. If those cytokines become excessive, a destructive “storm” may result, causing the failure of multiple organs, tissue damage, and septic shock.

An examination of blood samples found more instances of these inflammatory cytokines and chemical markers linked to tissue damage in coronavirus patients also experiencing gut bacteria imbalances.

All of these facts led researchers to conclude that the gut microbiome may have more influence on your body’s immune response to the coronavirus, along with its severity and how you’ll recover from it.

What this means for you

Although scientists were unwilling to cite any concrete causes, it’s clear to them there are connections between the microbiome and inflammatory diseases and that boosting the beneficial bacteria in the gut depleted by the novel coronavirus could become a way to lessen its severity.

As you know, many factors play a role in your gut’s health and diversity, from sleep schedules and exercise to your eating habits.

Taking a probiotic is one of the most straightforward steps you can take to protect the health of your gut too. But not any generic probiotic will do…

That’s why it’s important to look for a probiotic with multiple strains of proven beneficial bacteria like those from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families.

EndoMune Advanced Probiotic is uniquely fortified with ten strains of beneficial bacteria from both families along with a very important prebiotic (FOS) to protect your gut 24/7.

 

References

 

 

person holding tablet that displays text: "Statins and gut health"

Should You Take Statins For Your Gut Health?

You may remember my previous blog article that urged you to question what you read everywhere when it comes to probiotics.

At the time, a handful of people had asked me about some mainstream media reports that disputed the benefits of probiotics, so we addressed them directly, honestly and scientifically. If the need arises, we will do it again…

During a recent review of studies, I discovered another report that might lead a few of you down the wrong path, this time about statins, a common and very effective class of drugs that lowers your cholesterol levels.

Obesity and gut imbalances

As you know, obesity is a risk factor that can elevate your cholesterol levels and harm the healthy diversity of bacteria in your gut.

A recent study that tracked the gut health of nearly 900 obese patients in France, Germany and Denmark discovered those who had been treated with a statin drug, not only had lower their cholesterol levels but healthier gut bacteria profiles compared to people not taking those drugs.

What made the difference: A specific configuration of unhealthy gut bacteria (Bact2) in obese patients tied to gut inflammation and diseases like multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease that may be linked to inflammation too.

In fact, obese patients taking a statin drug had much lower levels of that unhealthy gut bacteria than those who didn’t use a statin drug and closer to levels observed in healthy, non-obese patients.

Take a statin drug for its real purpose

On the surface, those results sound encouraging, but here’s some things you need to consider.

For one, your chances of being obese, taking statins and having this specific kind of gut bacteria is very low, which brings little clarity to whether statins really help.

Plus, we warned you some time ago that some statins may work — or not — depending on your gut bacteria.

Fact is, statins are very safe and effective drugs for what they do: Lessening heart disease by reducing LDL (low-density) cholesterol, the fat-like, waxy substances that build up in the arteries.

Multiple studies have found statin drugs really are life-saving medications with very clear benefits.

However, a statin drug isn’t designed for the heavy-duty work that a probiotic like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic, formulated with 10 strains and 30 BILLION CFUs of beneficial bacteria and a proven prebiotic (FOS) that feeds the good guys in your gut, can do.

If you want to get healthy, give your body a gentle and natural weight-loss boost and begin to reduce your need for a statin drug, consider EndoMune Metabolic Rescue, a probiotic/prebiotic blend that stimulates the release of hormones that can create a greater sense of fullness and reduce your appetite.

Resources

woman with migraine laying in bed

Probiotics: A Safe Way to Treat Migraines

It’s very difficult to describe the debilitating, forceful pain migraine headaches exert on patients in vivid detail. Not only can migraine symptoms be frighteningly severe and wide-ranging, at their worst, they can last for more than three days!

One out of four households includes someone who experiences migraines, and 90 percent of those sufferers have a family history of problems with them too.

About three years ago, we explored the growing connection between the gut microbiome and migraines and how probiotics may serve as a way to treat them very soon.

That time may be much closer than we expected…

Multi-strain probiotics to the rescue

Some 80 patients out of 100 who were experiencing either episodic or chronic migraines completed a trial that evaluated the benefits of taking two daily doses of a multi-strain probiotic or a placebo for 8-10 weeks.

Patients in both migraine groups who took probiotics reported reductions in attacks by at least 40 percent and in intensity by at least 29 percent, exceptionally good results by any measure, compared to taking a placebo.

(Nine of the strains used in this trial are a part of EndoMune Advanced Probiotic’s effective and powerful mix of beneficial bacteria providing 30 billion CFUs in every serving.)

Given the duration and severity of pain people experience due to migraines, these results are certainly great news!

The hows and whys

Although the hows and whys probiotics make a difference in migraine treatments haven’t been nailed down, some health experts believe the gut-brain axis — the connection that links your intestines, emotions and brain — may be the reason.

A recent review of studies also cited other possible gut-based problems that could contribute to migraines, including some very familiar ones like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and leaky gut.

The other piece of the puzzle may come down to the multi-species advantage that probiotics like EndoMune address.

Multi-species probiotics are formulated to protect and strengthen the diversity of your gut as well as treat a wider range of health challenges, including sleep, mental health and hypertension.

Resources

EndoMune capsules displayed on blue background

Help Ease Your Anxiety with Probiotics

As our country watches the COVID-19 pandemic with apprehension, it’s no surprise that mental health specialists report a sharp increase in the number of anxiety and depression cases. A recent poll taken by the American Psychiatric Association indicates 36% ofAmericans said COVID-19 has made a serious impact on their mental health. If the physical isolation isn’t enough, the pandemic has escalated fears over potential job losses, bankruptcy, acute illness, and death.

Probiotic consumption has been a hot topic for research concerning the gut-brain axis in the past few years. The gut-brain axis (GBA) is the connection between the central nervous system (CNS) and the enteric nervous system (ENS.) That connection links the emotional and cognitive centers of the brain with our body’s intestinal functions. Recent research describes the important role gut microbiota play in these functions.

Probiotics protect against stress

That evidence suggests that probiotics can protect the body against the harmful physical and mental effects of stress. Conversely, it also suggests that probiotics can help regulate mood by keeping the gut microbiome balanced and performing optimally. That means if we want better mood and mental health, we need to take care of our guts.

However, gut bacteria can also be altered by stress, leading to suboptimal gut health. Moreover, other things can reduce the efficiency of our gut function such as antibiotics, intestinal infections, and poor diet – all of which can kill off beneficial or “good” bacteria. A lack of good bacteria in the gut has also been associated with other health problems such as leaky gut, irritable bowel syndrome, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Clearly, this evidence indicates we can’t achieve optimum health unless our guts are maintained at peak efficiency and fortifying our microbiota with probiotics may be a way to both fight and prevent anxiety and mood disorders.

How it works

The bacteria in our gut enhance our resilience to stressful situations by helping seal the gut barrier. When our microbiome is not balanced, its compromised, inefficient gut function can have a negative impact on our overall health (including mental health), due to leakage of hormones and intestinal inflammation.

If the gut lining stays porous for too long, it can allow toxins and toxic bacteria into our body, where some of those toxins can pass through the blood-brain barriers that protect the brain from these types of pathogens.

That’s how a balanced gut microbiome strengthens the gut lining, protects us against leaky gut, and reduces gut inflammation, which in turn plays a role in our mental well-being.

Inflammation also affects the central nervous system and can cause symptoms of depression; but conversely, depression can cause inflammation itself. That’s why having a robust, diverse microbiome is necessary to help control inflammation by strengthening the gut lining, and preventing unwanted toxins from entering the body.

Researchers report that people who suffer from anxiety often have symptoms of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders such as IBS, gas, and diarrhea. These ‘co-occurring disorders’ help cement the conclusions over the importance of the gut-brain axis and its role in many common illnesses.

The link between the gut-brain axis plays a critical role in how healthy we are, and an ever-increasing body of evidence strongly suggests that the microbiota in your gut influences every other aspect of your overall health – including our mental health. Simply put, it seems that now, more than ever, it’s impossible to maintain a healthy lifestyle unless our guts are happy and thriving, and everyone’s first step to better health should be to repair our guts. Consequently, dietary changes and probiotics are some of the methods researchers use to alter the microbiota in patients to help treat anxiety and depression.

Since microbiota has such an important impact on your entire body, it’s not surprising that taking probiotics for your mood doesn’t just benefit our mental health in one way. Probiotics may also help other precursors associated with an increased risk of anxiety:

  1. Helps reduce inflammation, and research suggests that depression may be an inflammatory disease
  2. Increases tryptophan, the happiness hormone, which stimulates natural serotonin production.
  3. Certain probiotic strains, like L. Rhamnosus, help reduce levels of the stress hormone corticosterone.
  4. Some strains of probiotics may possess inherent anti-depressant qualities.

Research on probiotics and the brain-gut connection continues, but the importance of this connection seems clear. Incorporating more probiotic foods in your diet, is a great step to achieving robust overall health. Unfortunately, our fast-paced lifestyles and the ever-present temptations of industrialized food make eating well-balanced, healthy meals hard. The easy answer to that is to help our guts with a probiotic supplement like an EndoMune Probiotic.  Try one today – your body and your mental health will thank you.

EndoMune is 13 Years Strong!

Happy 13th Birthday… To Us!

In the midst of the many distractions the world has thrown at us so far in 2020, it’s hard to believe that EndoMune’s birthday has come around once again!

The world has changed a lot since I started EndoMune in 2007…

When I was a full-time gastroenterologist, I was concerned with helping my patients relieve symptoms related to issues like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), constipation, traveler’s diarrhea, colic and gas — not to mention boosting immune health — that I felt an urgency to create EndoMune.

All of the reasons to protect your gut health with probiotics still exist today. In fact, there are many more of them to think about…

As the list of problems keep growing, EndoMune’s mission remains constant: Protecting your body’s immune health.

Frankly, that mission has never been more important in my lifetime than it is right now, as we’re facing a global health crisis with the coronavirus pandemic, the likes of which none of us have ever seen.

We’ve taken the steps to ensure that every member of your family has all the support we can provide, from EndoMune Jr. Advanced Probiotic Powder for your baby to EndoMune Jr. Advanced Chewable for your growing child to EndoMune Advanced Probiotic for the grownup gut.

Along the way, we developed EndoMune Metabolic Rescue, a probiotic formulated with your gut and waistline in mind to slow down your appetite, increase fullness and help you lose weight.

You’ve depended on us for your immunity needs for the last 13 years, and we’ve worked hard to earn your trust.

We’re not going anywhere. In fact, we’re just getting started…

To you and yours in good gut health!

Dr. Lawrence Hoberman

mom holding up baby and kissing it on the cheek

Breastfeeding: Protecting Your Baby from Allergies

Allergies are among the most common and persistent health problems children face. Children’s allergies come with a myriad number of causes and symptoms ranging from “hay fever” (allergic rhinitis,) and skin rashes (hives and eczema) to more concerning conditions like asthma. In worst cases, kid’s allergies trigger serious health problems such as life-threatening allergic reactions to certain foods or medications. Allergies affect up to nearly 10 percent of all kids under age 18.

Mothers wants their children to be as healthy as possible, and wouldn’t it be great if there was a way to help prevent your child from developing allergies? Previously, we showed how easy it is to boost a baby’s immune system and gut health through a simple practice like breastfeeding.  The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends new mothers breastfeed their babies for at least the first six months of the baby’s life, and new studies suggest that breastfeeding helps to prevent your child from developing allergies.

However, many new mothers find it problematic to breastfeed for the entire six months, but infants breastfed every day for just his/her first three months may reduce their chances of developing respiratory allergies and asthma significantly by the time your child is old enough to go to school.

The benefits of breastfeeding

Many scientists have examined the benefits of breastfeeding, but most limited their research to an all-or-nothing choice, meaning the studies focused on infants who were breastfed against those who were not breastfed. Infants whose mothers breastfed intermittently were ignored. Now, a study from the University of Maryland at Baltimore evaluated health data on nearly 1,200 moms and babies obtained from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II, based on intermittent periods of exclusive breastfeeding over the first three months of their lives. To be clear, these mothers alternated between feeding their babies breastmilk and formula.

These mothers reported their breastfeeding schedules in addition to any incidents of viral infections or wheezing during the first three months of their baby’s life. The also reported when they introduced solid foods, complete family health histories, and other health related variables. Then, scientists examined the aggregated data looking for incidents of respiratory problems and asthma at age 6.

The data clearly indicated that nearly one third of these children, who were breastfed exclusively for their first three months, were 23 percent more likely to avoid respiratory allergies, and 34 percent of them were less likely to have asthma (but only if they didn’t have a family history of asthma).

On the other hand, intermittent breastfeeding had little significant effect on reducing the risk of developing respiratory ailments.

Significantly, infants fed exclusively with formula experienced the highest rates of asthma and respiratory problems.

A healthy option if you can’t breastfeed

Unfortunately, less than half of all working mothers in America are able to breastfeed their newborns exclusively through the first three months of their lives. That percentage drops to 25 percent through the first six months, according to the CDC. These unfortunate statistics mean a large population of American infants risk developing allergies that otherwise would be potentially preventable with natural breastfeeding.

Fortunately, concerned mothers unable to exclusively breastfeed their baby can help protect their baby’s immune system, safely, effectively, and help them avoid developing allergies or asthma with a probiotic formulated exclusively just for infants like EndoMune Junior Advanced Probiotic Powder. Sprinkling one tiny scoop of EndoMune Junior in their food or formula once a day feeds the good bugs in your baby’s gut and gives his/her growing immune system the gentle boost he/she needs!

(Please be sure to check with your pediatrician before starting your baby on EndoMune or any probiotic.)

Resources

Illustration of orange pill bottle on dark blue background

Should You Really Be Taking an Antibiotic?

The last time you visited your doctor, you may have received a prescription of an antibiotic. Did you take the initiative to ask the physician if you really needed that antibiotic you were prescribed?

Often, antibiotics serve as effective tools that solve a multitude of health problems, but only when they’re really necessary. Patients rely too often on antibiotics even for minor problems, like viruses or bacterial infections that don’t even respond these kinds of drugs.

Maybe, you pressured your doctor to prescribe a round of antibiotics just so you could get well and get back to work…

Consider this scary report about the rampant over-prescribing of antibiotics as your latest wake-up call to really consider whether you really need them or not.

No reason to prescribe antibiotics

A team of Oregon-based scientists examined how often patients received prescriptions for antibiotics out of nearly a billion of outpatient visits nationwide.

They examined samples of data culled from the 2015 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, looking for indications whether antibiotic prescriptions were necessary, inappropriate or issued for no documented reason.

Antibiotics were prescribed in about 13 percent of those visits (some 130 million times). A majority of them (57 percent) were judged to be medically appropriate and necessary.

But that’s only part of the story…

The remainder of antibiotics were inappropriately prescribed (25 percent) or issued for no documented reason (18 percent). In other words, many of the 56 million prescriptions for antibiotics in those other categories were probably unnecessary.

Many of those wasted prescriptions were for urinary anti-infective agents, drugs used to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs). What’s more, patients who spent more time with their physicians or suffered from chronic health issues were prescribed antibiotics for no reason.

Probiotics to the rescue

All of these unnecessary prescriptions come with a huge price: Creating an antibiotic-resistant world where these valuable drugs lose their ability to work properly.

The end results are superbug infections stemming from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) that can be impossible to treat.

The most important takeaway is pretty simple: If you need to take an antibiotic for any reason, be aware these drugs can create imbalances in your gut that harm your immune system and slow down your ability to get well.

Your best weapon to protect your health and help your body do the hard work of healing with a little damage as possible is a probiotic, ideally with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

EndoMune’s powerful formula of 10 beneficial strains of bacteria from the Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillusfamilies and a prebiotic (that feeds the good bugs in your gut) not only protects and enhances your immune health.

(If you’re suffering from a urinary tract infection, probiotics like EndoMune are a safe and proven way to treat them.)

It helps that very necessary antibiotic you need to do its job to help you get well when you really need it.

Resources

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