Free shipping on all orders over $125*
Due to rising temperatures, orders will ship Monday-Thursday.

probiotics

Ali Bourgerie of Shifting Nutrition sitting down with two EndoMune bottles

Q&A with Ali Bourgerie, Board-Certified Holistic Nutritionist and Founder of Shifting Nutrition

Tell us about your background and how you found yourself starting your own business focused on holistic health and nutrition.

I grew up an athlete and from a young age was conscious about what I ate, but in high school I had a lot of digestive issues. I went to college and got my first degree in health and exercise science and came out of school thinking I had landed my dream job training professional athletes. From that experience and being a body builder as well as still dealing with gut health issues, I started doing my own research and realized that it was all about what I was putting in my body that mattered most, for both my physical and mental health.

I was so eager to learn more about how I could heal my body naturally and feel the best results I was after and decided to go back to school to get my master’s in nutrition. After graduation, I moved to Portland, Oregon, and worked under a naturopath for several years while building my business that I have now on the side. I learned even more that the ultimate goal is to get the body into balance, and that doing so in a natural way is the best way to improve health and see and feel results. This led me to Shifting Nutrition and helping my clients today.

Why do you think it is important to combine good nutrition with education for your clients?

I am all about using whole foods as medicine to change lives, not a quick fix in 30 days. I find if clients understand why – the purpose behind it – it makes all the difference. The education piece on why we are doing what we are doing and eating what we are eating is what makes new healthy habits stick and become sustainable in the long run. In order to continue to do something we must understand WHY we are doing it. For example, why eating a wide variety of vegetables is important; not just the different vitamins and minerals, but how eating a wide variety of plants brings different nutrients. Or why taking a probiotic supplement can benefit your overall health. The wider the variety of beneficial bacteria present in our body, the better our gut health. I truly believe knowledge is power!

Do you recommend probiotics for all your clients? What benefits do you see to adding probiotics to your daily regimen?

I recommend probiotics for the majority of people. Some are ready; others need some time before introducing probiotics. It depends on where they are in their journey. The overall goal of taking them is to balance the ecosystem within our bodies and influence the activity of the healthy bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract, which research now shows is necessary for improving our overall health. Many Americans eat a diet and live a lifestyle that causes dysbiosis, a bacterial imbalance within primarily the stomach and intestines. This can stem from too much sugar, food additives, lingering pesticides, drinking too much alcohol, and even high levels of stress and anxiety. Common symptoms my clients experience include bad breath, upset stomach, constipation or diarrhea, bloating, fatigue, anxiety, and difficulty concentrating. So, yes, for most people I believe a probiotic can help.

The gut-brain axis is a critical connection in our bodies, and you mention it in several of your posts. How do you help educate your clients about this connection that they may not have heard about before?

When we get the feeling of butterflies in our stomach, this tells us the gut and brain are very connected. What we call the gut-brain axis is how the two organs communicate. Our gut contains 500 million neurons that send signals back and forth in both directions. They are also connected through chemicals called neurotransmitters, which control feelings and emotions. GABA and serotonin are transmitters present in the gut that link to mood, sleep, and feelings of anxiety. We also have trillions of microbes in the gut, which make chemicals that affect how our brain and the rest of our body works including how our immune system responds. This axis shows the importance of taking care of our gut health in order to bring the body into balance and start to diminish some symptoms.

How do you see EndoMune Metabolic Rescue benefitting clients or people looking to lose weight?

I do recommend Metabolic Rescue for naturally curbing appetite and cravings. I guide my clients to work with their bodies, not against them.  When we are in tune with our bodies we are more in tune with our appetite and better at reading our body. We learn more about our true eating habits. Why are we eating? Out of boredom, because someone else around us is eating, or eating just because it’s time for a meal rather than feeling hungry. Reading our body better will naturally start to lower overall caloric intake without our feeling restricted. I am all about the mindset when it comes to food, and I think feeling restricted is one of the biggest things people struggle with. Taking EndoMune Metabolic Rescue, which is not harmful yet beneficial toward reaching their goals, I think is great.

What changes did you see in your own body when you started taking EndoMune Advanced and Metabolic Rescue?

I loved them pretty quickly; it only took a couple of days to notice a difference. The strains and combination were exactly what I wanted and was looking for in a probiotic, which is entirely important when choosing a brand. I had some inflammation and digestive issues like bloating and gas calm down, and my bowels were more regular. Over the haul, it eased cravings and I noticed my natural energy improve. My immune system seemed stronger, as I did not catch the colds my boyfriend caught.  I knew it was doing the job.

Image of milk splashing with text: Is Raw Milk Really a Safe, Good Probiotic Food?

Is Raw Milk Really a Safe, Good Probiotic Food?

One question people ask us a lot revolves around probiotic foods — we’re looking at you fermented foods! — and if they can really make a meaningful difference to their gut health. A growing number of people are moving away from pasteurized milk in favor of raw milk as a “healthier” means to achieve those very same probiotic food benefits.

But is raw milk a safe and healthy probiotic food?

The Raw Milk Controversy

Raw milk has a controversial history in America. People who sell it claim the process of pasteurization strips milk of its many health benefits, yet it’s illegal to sell or buy it in 19 states.

The Raw Milk Institute features an attention-grabbing claim on its website that states, “the protective effects of raw cow’s milk on infections were comparable to those of breastfeeding.”

On the other hand, the FDA devotes an entire page on its website to the misconceptions and dangers of drinking raw milk, citing studies that debunk its use in treating asthma and allergies, lactose intolerance and osteoporosis or that it is safe or good for your gut.

What’s the Real Story?

After studying more than 2,000 retail samples of raw and pasteurized milk from five states, researchers at the University of California, Davis discovered two very alarming things about the microbial properties of raw milk in a report featured in Microbiome.

First, scientists did not find large quantities of beneficial bacteria in raw milk samples.

Second, leaving raw milk out at room temperature to ferment (to make what’s known as a yogurt-like food called clabber) created the opportunity for the growth of many more antimicrobial-resistant genes than those found in pasteurized milk.

What’s more, bacteria with those antimicrobial-resistant genes have the potential to become superbugs if they’re passed on to a pathogen, which means you could get sick and discover that drug you rely on to get well may not work.

So, the take-home message here is pretty simple: Eat probiotic foods only in moderation and only if they’re safe.

A very dependable and easy way to get all of the beneficial bacteria your gut needs to keep your immune system healthy and strong is to take a daily probiotic, ideally with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

References

 

 

Image of infant with text: The Solution For Your Baby’s Colic: Probiotics

The Solution For Your Baby’s Colic: Probiotics

If we took a poll of parents and asked them about common health problems they dread the most with their healthy newborn child, there’s no doubt that the frequent and prolonged distress that comes with colic would top the list. Fussiness and crying are expected with babies during their first year, particularly when they’re uncomfortable, tired or hungry.

But, when the crying becomes intense, sudden and continuous — lasting at least three hours a day several times a week, then continuing for more than three weeks — it’s a safe bet colic is the problem.

Many factors play a role in triggering colic. A number of them are connected to a baby’s developing gut health, including acid reflux, too much gas (due to swallowing air while crying) and gut bacteria imbalances.

During a lengthy crying fit, parents may do just about anything to console their colicky babies, including treating them with drops of simethicone, an over-the-counter drug intended to break up gas bubbles in the gut.

Simethicone may be a more convenient treatment, but is it really more effective than giving colicky babies a probiotic?

Probiotic Advantages

Generally, the consensus on using simethicone is very mixed with some resources and health professionals finding very little evidence that it has any value in treating colic. On the other hand, probiotics are emerging as a far more effective and direct way to relieve colic.

A recent report appearing in the medical journal Beneficial Microbes underscores this difference, comparing the benefits of simethicone to a multi-strain probiotic among 87 babies (fed by formula or breast milk) for four weeks.

Although there were no major disparities in the number of times babies cried in either group, infants responded well to the multi-strain probiotic, reducing the number of crying days overall and how long they cried at night.

These results are further evidence that unhealthy imbalances in gut bacteria among babies who lack some key strains of beneficial bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families may be at the root of colic and may be better addressed with a probiotic.

In fact, four of the beneficial strains and the prebiotic (FOS) used in this study are the same ones in EndoMune Junior Advanced Probiotic Powder, formulated for newborns through age 3.

An important doctor’s note: Please check with your pediatrician before giving your baby with a probiotic!

References

 

 

Five capsules on a wooden measuring spoon next to a glass of water. Text: 4 Good reasons why you need a probiotic

Four Reasons Why You Need a Probiotic

Given that your attention has been diverted very recently to more pressing issues like the coronavirus, it’s a good time to remind you about a few of the many good reasons you should be taking a probiotic.

1. Maintaining the healthy balance of your gut

Did you know that an unhealthy imbalance of bacteria in your gut can make you vulnerable to a more severe case of the coronavirus?

The gut health of patients stricken with the coronavirus lacked strains of beneficial bacteria that could muster a good immune system response, according to a very recent study.

What’s more, severe cases of the coronavirus among patients were linked to the absence of several strains of beneficial bacteria in their gut, including Bifidobacterium bifidum (one of the potent strains of bacteria featured in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.)

2. Protecting your gut health from common drugs

We’re learning more by the day about the effect even ordinary over-the-counter drugs like aspirin may have on your gut.

Taking a probiotic may be helpful in relieving gut-related problems linked to taking aspirin, and it won’t interfere with the cardiovascular reasons patients take a low-dose aspirin every day either.

3. Getting the restful sleep you need

We’ve talked a lot about the benefits of taking a probiotic to help you get a good night’s sleep due to abrupt changes in your body’s circadian sleep cycles triggered by jet lag or late-night work schedules, and sleep apnea can be problematic for your gut too.

However, the combination of a probiotic plus a CPAP device can do wonders to relieve most of the common fatigue patients experience, and it may lower the risks of other health problems like metabolic syndrome too.

4. Evaluating the real benefits of probiotic foods

Many people choose some foods with the best intentions for their gut based on the latest fads they see on the news, like a recent one regarding caffeinated coffee.

But, drinking coffee every day, with its highly acidic content, just to give your gut health a major boost can also lead to more problems (like heartburn) than benefits.

There are no shortcuts when it comes to protecting that critical balance, and you need a healthy gut to take advantage of the slight benefits any food may provide.

However, taking a daily probiotic formulated with multiple strains of bacteria is a proven way to protect the long-term health of your gut.

When you’re on the lookout for a probiotic that’s formulated to help your gut health get back on track, be sure to look for one with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families, plus a prebiotic that feeds the good bacteria in your gut, like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

Resources

 

 

Bad diet or bad genes

The Gut or Your Genes: What Affects Your Health More?

We’re pretty sure you’ve heard the same old phrase, You are what you eat! way too many times to count.

Nevertheless, there’s a certain amount of logic to this saying, given that eating poorly has been proven to kill you faster than smoking or even a serious car accident!

Plus, the three leading causes of deaths associated with inadequate diets — cardiovascular disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes — can be largely preventable with the right amount of attention to your health.

There’s no question the quality and kinds of foods you eat also affects the healthy balance of bacteria in your gut very directly… but just how much?

Would you think twice about eating a nutrient-dense diet more often and processed foods a little less often if you knew doing so had a more powerful effect on your overall health than your genes?

Nutrition matters

The foundation upon which this international study of nearly 1,100 patients conducted in the U.S. and Europe was built is one we’ve talked about for a long time.

The quality of the diet you eat every day directly affects your gut, leaving you more or less vulnerable to health problems.

Patients who ate a diverse diet full of minimally-processed, nutrient-rich foods had healthy microbiomes, while those consuming unhealthier diets chock full of processed foods, juices, and refined grains had microbiomes full of harmful bacteria.

That’s not new.

What is new: Scientists identified specific bacterial strains associated with affecting a patient’s risks of health problems like heart disease, obesity, and heart disease, both good and bad.

For example, the presence of the species Blastocytis was associated with maintaining healthy blood sugar levels after meals, certainly a good thing.

What’s more, scientists linked these bacteria to specific food groups, nutrients, and diets, which explains why they concluded that what you eat may have a more significant impact on the gut and your health than your genes.

“Given the highly personalized composition of each individuals’ microbiome, our research suggests that we may be able to modify our gut microbiome to optimize our health by choosing the best foods for our unique biology,” says Dr. Sarah Berry of King’s College London.

In fact, some of these microbiome-based biomarkers for cardiovascular disease, impaired glucose intolerance, and obesity identified by scientists are also key risk factors for the coronavirus.

Protect the health of your gut

The important lesson — taking ownership by eating more nutritious meals consistently and cutting back on highly processed foods for the health of your gut — appears much more evident now than ever.

Your genes may not have the influence experts once assumed, but that’s an empowering thing. Now, you’re in the driver’s seat to make the changes you need, starting with protecting and improving the healthy balance of bacteria in your gut.

In addition to eating more nutritious meals made of whole foods, a probiotic, ideally formulated with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria, can be a great, natural tool to help you re-establish your gut’s healthy balance too.

The ten proven strains of beneficial bacteria in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic can make a huge difference in balancing your gut microbiome and help you protect your health naturally.

 

Resources

 

 

Are you boiling your water?

Are You Boiling Your Water?

With the remnants of the multiple winter storms finally making their way out of the United States, an estimated 14 million Texans and many more across the country are being affected by boil-water advisories.

Suppose you haven’t encountered a boil water advisory before. In that case, local utility companies issue them during and after natural disasters, including this most recent trio of winter storms and even hurricanes like ones that have hit the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts in the past.

Local utilities typically order boil water advisories to protect your body from the possibility of water contaminated by parasites, viruses, and bacteria that can make you sick – and yes, these recommendations extend to our furry friends and pets as well!

What does the boil water advisory mean for you? In short, there are certain things you should and should notdo with tap water unless it’s boiled first. Local water experts instruct you to boil tap water (even if it’s filtered) for at least two to three minutes before drinking it, using it for cooking meals or brushing your teeth. That includes water or ice delivery systems connected to your refrigerator.

However, bathing (don’t drink the bathwater!), using your dishwasher, and doing laundry are all still acceptable with clear-running tap water. Keep in mind, we’re also still in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic, so this isn’t an excuse to skip handwashing with antibacterial soap!

During the aftermath of these natural disasters is no time for your family to forget to take a probiotic either. EndoMune Advanced Probiotic has 30 billion colony forming units of 10 strains of beneficial bacteria (plus a very important prebiotic) that could give your intestinal immune system a much-needed boost when your body may come into contact with nasty bacteria that can harm you. Don’t forget – your pets can also benefit from probiotics and a healthy immune system, just like we humans do.

Stay safe, stay healthy, and take your probiotics, friends!

Resources

 

 

 

 

Parent Holding Preemie Baby's Foot

How Probiotics May Protect Your Preemie Baby

Premature babies have a lot of obstacles to overcome. One of the most serious health challenges they face is necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a condition that affects their intestines.

This problem occurs when bacteria attack the intestinal wall which causes inflammation, then cracks that can allow these invaders to leak into the abdomen. Without treatment, babies face serious infections and an increased risk of death very early in their lives.

Although scientists aren’t exactly sure what causes NEC, apart from being born prematurely, babies who are fed formula rather than human breast milk via breastfeeding (that’s easier to digest and full of the nutrients they need to boost their tiny immune systems) are at a greater risk for this serious disease.

Fortunately, doctors have had success treating preemie babies with probiotics to prevent risks of NEC, but how well do they really work?

The multi-strain probiotic difference

A group of European researchers compared the effect of treating three groups of preemie babies with two different mixes of probiotics from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families to infants who received no probiotics in a recent study appearing in Gut Microbes.

(Two strains of beneficial bacteria used in this study are the foundation of EndoMune Junior Advanced Probiotic Powder.)

Infants who were delivered mostly via C-section and up to 10 weeks early received a multi-strain probiotic or a placebo until 36 weeks. No surprise, the probiotic preemie groups experienced improved gut health (greater consistency, fewer variations) in their tiny microbiomes.

Even more promising, an analysis of fecal samples discovered reduced amounts of bacteria linked to NEC among infants given probiotics.

And, there’s even more good news!

Probiotic guidance for doctors

Many neonatal doctors struggle with making the best choices to help their preemie patients avoid NEC, but a very recent analysis of 45 trials and more than 12,000 infants published in Pediatrics gave the nod to the one-two power of probiotics and prebiotics.

Formulations of probiotics containing Bifidobacterium or Lactobacillus blends plus a prebiotic significantly reduced the odds that an infant faces NEC, compared to a placebo, by 68 and 94 percent, respectively.

What’s more, treating infants with beneficial strains of Lactobacillus and a prebiotic decreased an infant’s risks of sepsis, another potentially life-threatening problem triggered by the body due to an infection, by an amazing 82 percent.

The probiotic advantage for your baby

Are you a Mom who may need to deliver your newborn via C-section? Breastfeeding is a great way to give your baby that gut-friendly head start. Should problems arise, you may want to take that extra step — with guidance from your pediatricians — to give your baby a probiotic tailored to his/her needs.

Protecting your baby’s developing immune system can be as easy as sprinkling a multi-species probiotic powder like EndoMune Junior in a liquid or noncarbonated formula or on soft foods once a day.

EndoMune Junior Infant Probiotic Powder features four beneficial strains of beneficial bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families, plus a prebiotic (FOS), that’s formulated to help reduce your newborn’s risks of NEC.

 

Resources

 

 

blank shampoo bottle from home

Are Gut-Harming Chemicals Hiding in Your Home?

It’s never been easier to keep our homes and ourselves clean and germ-free, even during a pandemic. All of that antimicrobial/antibacterial “power” comes a great cost, however, creating overly sterilized home environments that are too clean for own good gut health. Gut-harming chemicals can hide in places you’d never think to look, like yoga mats and even the walls of your home.

But, what about other chemicals that find their way into other products our families come in contact with every day, like shampoos, detergents, cosmetics and water-repellant fabrics?

These substances — semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) — can be just as harmful to human gut health, especially to the youngest of us.

Unhealthy tradeoffs for convenience

A group of scientists examined how the impact of SVOCs in everyday environments affected gut health by measuring their levels in blood, urine and fecal samples taken from 69 young children (from toddlers to preschoolers).

In those samples, scientists detected levels of SVOCs commonly found in raincoats, shower curtains, soaps, shampoos and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) used to coat non-stick cookware, fast food packaging, carpets and furniture.

What’s more, children with higher levels of PFASs in their bloodstreams experienced reductions in the diversity and amounts of bacteria in their guts.

Here’s how resourceful and remarkable the human gut is: Children who had higher levels of these chemicals in their blood also had several kinds of bacteria in their guts that clean up toxic materials.

Unfortunately, these unique strains of bacteria aren’t usually found in the human gut. In fact, they are often used to clean up harmful chemical residues (think dry cleaning solvents) from the environment.

“Finding the increased levels of these bacteria in the gut means that, potentially, the gut microbiome is trying to correct itself,” says lead researcher Dr. Courtney Gardner.

“Gaining a more holistic understanding of the interactions between man-made chemicals, the gut microbiome and human health is a critical step in advancing public health.”

The probiotic solution

If exposure to these chemicals that persist in our environment is a constant problem for all of us, the best and healthiest solution for protecting our gut health is a simple one.

Taking a probiotic formulated with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria that mirrors and enhances the diversity of your gut microbiome is critical.

The 10 tried-and-true strains of beneficial bacteria from the Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus families contained in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic along with the prebiotic (FOS) can make a very big difference in balancing your gut microbiome and promoting better immune health too.

 

Resources

 

The basics of taking a probiotic

How to Take a Probiotic: The Basics

You’ve done your research. You’ve talked to your physician (or nurse practitioner) and confirmed that it’s a good idea for you and your family to take a probiotic.

Assuming you’ve chosen the right probiotic — ideally one with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria — your next decision is a critical one.

How do you take a probiotic to get the most out of it?

If you’re a healthy adult

Adults receive that gut health boost if they take a probiotic about 30 minutes before eating their first meal of the day (probably a morning meal) or on an empty stomach, ideally with water.

The goal is to give the beneficial bacteria in a probiotic some extra time to travel from the bottle to your gut without food getting in the way.

An often-cited study in the health journal Beneficial Microbes concluded probiotics containing multiple strains of key bacterial strains survived when taken before a meal (including two of the 10 important strains in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic).

On the other hand, taking a probiotic after a meal, when stomach acid is at its highest, was the worst time as beneficial bacteria survive in far fewer numbers.

If you’re raising a healthy kid

Young children may need some extra help, especially if their developing gut health may have been compromised or they’re having problems like constipation.

For children under age 3, parents can help to protect their developing immune systems and potentially reduce problems with colic by sprinkling a multi-species probiotic in powdered form (like EndoMune Junior Advanced Probiotic Powder) in a liquid or noncarbonated formula or on soft foods before or with their meal once a day.

Once your child moves past her/his toddler times, he/she graduates to a probiotic of their own, for example, the chewy, fruity EndoMune Junior Advanced Chewable Probiotic.

On that sick day

We’ve been relieved to hear that it’s become much more common to see patients taking a probiotic when they’ve been prescribed an antibiotic.

Antibiotics are very effective so long as they’re prescribed when they’re really needed. Unfortunately, they can also become a real problem by wiping out the good bacteria in your gut while letting the bad bugs hang around and create more problems like those related to superbug infections.

That’s where taking a probiotic can limit the problems. Just be sure to give yourself a two-hour break between taking an antibiotic and probiotic. That extra gap gives those beneficial bacteria some extra time to do their work.

The prebiotic boost

When you’re taking a probiotic, be sure that it includes prebiotics, the unsung heroes of gut health.

Made of non-digestible plant fibers and carbohydrates, prebiotics do a lot of the important work behind the scenes to feed the bacteria living in your gut, thus stimulate their growth.

For example, EndoMune Advanced Probiotic, EndoMune Advanced Junior Chewable Probiotic, and EndoMune Advanced Probiotic Powder contain fructooligosaccharides (FOS) that are contained in many plant foods like garlic, leeks, asparagus, and bananas.

One more thing

We encourage you to talk to your doctor before starting a probiotic. It’s really important to address any concerns either of you have, particularly if you’re taking a drug for a specific health issue, like an immunosuppressant or antifungal.

Resources

Beneficial Microbes

Medscape

Healthline

 

bottle of EndoMune Advanced Probiotic next to a digital graphic of Omega-3 oil

Omega-3s and Probiotics Team Up For Better Health (Yours!)

For a very long time, omega-3 rich fish oil has sat alongside probiotics as an important go-to supplements patients rely on every day for their good health.

That’s a good thing. Our go-go-go lifestyles often leave little time for eating anything but highly processed meals chock full of omega-6 fatty acids and lacking in any nutritional value.

This tendency to eat on the run has gone a long way toward fueling our country’s continuing obesity epidemic that leaves you vulnerable to metabolic syndrome, a cluster of conditions occurring all at once that increase your risks of more serious cardiovascular problems.

A team of Swedish researchers has shared some interesting ways both omega-3s and probiotics team up for better health (yours!) in a recent report appearing in the medical journal Nutrients.

Treating inflammation

Reducing inflammation in your body is critical as we’ve learned with leaky gut. This condition, created by breakdowns in the intestinal wall, allows bacterial particles to seep into the bloodstream that stimulates inflammation and triggers health problems like metabolic syndrome.

In this Swedish review, researchers examined some of the mechanisms in which probiotics and the omega-3s in fish oil work together and on their own to promote better health.

The key reason why omega-3s and probiotics may work so well together: Both share a common pathway to work with our body’s immune system, a critical part of keeping inflammation in check.

For example, scientists describe how omega-3 fatty acids may work just like prebiotic compounds, the unsung heroes of gut health.

The EndoMune family of probiotics, from EndoMune Jr. Advanced Chewables to EndoMune Metabolic Rescue, also contains proven prebiotics that do the dirty work of feeding the good bacteria in your gut and a whole lot more.

Probiotics and omega-3s have also been connected to improvements in insulin and blood glucose levels among patients battling diabetes and pre-diabetes, part of the cluster of problems associated with metabolic syndrome.

The real benefit

The best benefit of pairing omega-3 fish oil and probiotics: It’s a safe, drug-free strategy most people can follow very easily. The real challenge, however, is choosing the best ones for your health.

When you’re looking for the best fish oil supplement, review product labels to ensure you choose one that contains the most EPA and DHA, two difference-making omega-3s. Many brands have little to none of either one.

Studying product labels is very important when selecting the best probiotic for your health too.

As you search for the right probiotic for your health, look for brands that contain multiple species of beneficial bacteria. For example, EndoMune Advanced Probiotic is carefully formulated with species from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families that support a balanced, healthy gut and protect your immune health.

Resources

Nutrients

Mayo Clinic

Healthline

 

 

 

 

Scroll to Top