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Could Probiotics Protect You From Microplastics?

Could Probiotics Protect You From Microplastics?

Summary: Harmful microplastics are everywhere and even in our bodies, but there may be a gut-friendly solution in probiotics.

Not a day goes by that we don’t hear something in the news about the growing challenges of plastics polluting our environment.

The problem has become so severe, a growing body of research has concluded that microplastics (pieces of plastic the size of a sesame seed) are even polluting our own bodies, from our lungs to our blood.
Where these microplastics come from is no surprise, given how much we rely on plastic for everything from tires to disposable water bottles. This passive exposure also infects the foods we grow and even the air we breathe.
The tiny microplastic particles can also be easily absorbed by the gut causing all sorts of problems with leaky gut and the healthy balance of bacteria in your gut, the center of your body’s immune system.

Probiotic protection

Fortunately, we may have a very natural way to protect our bodies and collective gut health from harm with help from probiotics, based on a recent review of studies appearing in Frontiers in Nutrition.
Researchers reviewed studies published from 2015-23 that showed how probiotics may ease inflammation and protect our bodies from some toxicity due to microplastic exposure.
Some studies showed how the beneficial bacteria contained in probiotics could absorb and neutralize heavy metals like mercury and cadmium. At the same time, some strains reduced problems by binding to and degrading phthalates (chemicals used to make plastics more durable) and BPA (a chemical used to produce polycarbonate plastics).

In a more recent study, Chinese scientists found that probiotic strains alleviated inflammation just enough to improve the quality of sperm in mice due to exposure to polystyrene microplastics (used to build appliances, electronics and many car parts).
For the foreseeable future, the persistence of microplastics is here to stay and research is just scraping the surface about the benefits of probiotics.
If you’re asking yourself what you could do to protect your body from the harmful effects of microplastics, it’s worth noting that some of the protective strains of beneficial bacteria examined in these studies are featured in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

Resources

Science News
Frontiers in Nutrition
Nutra Ingredients Europe
The Guardian
Environmental Health News
Nutrition Insight
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety

Could Probiotics Protect You From Microplastics? Read More »

Could Probiotics Protect You From COVID?

Could Probiotics Protect You From COVID?

Summary: Probiotics may provide extra protection to unvaccinated people after exposure to COVID to delay infections and reduce their symptoms.

Since the beginning of the COVID era, medical science has acknowledged the connection between this serious respiratory disease and a person’s gut health.
Often, gut dysbiosis — disruptions in the healthy balance of bacteria in your gut — have been the focal point in studies that link your health to COVID.
Not so long ago, we learned how probiotics can do a lot of good to alleviate common symptoms for patients already suffering from Long COVID.
The benefits of probiotics may also extend to people exposed to COVID who haven’t received a vaccine, according to findings recently published in Clinical Nutrition.

Protection before a vaccine

Recognizing how effective probiotics were in relieving respiratory infections, researchers at Duke University and the University of North Carolina launched a study prior to the widespread release of vaccines in 2020 to test the protective effective of probiotics on the unvaccinated who had been exposed to COVID.
Half of the 182 patients took a probiotic containing a proprietary strain of Lactobacillus while the rest received a placebo daily for four weeks.
No surprise, those who took a probiotic were 60 percent less likely to develop COVID symptoms even after exposure to the disease compared to those in the placebo group and were able to protect themselves from contracting COVID for a longer time.
And, probiotic patients had more significant remnants of beneficial bacteria in stool samples taken 70 and 85 days after the initial trial too.

Although the study’s sample size was small (due to the rapid development of vaccines), scientists were very encouraged about the results yet not surprised by them, says Dr. Paul Wischmeyer, co-lead author on the study.
“While limited in sample size, our study lends credence to the notion that our symbiotic microbes can be valuable partners in the fight against COVID-19 and potentially other future pandemic diseases.

So, if you’ve been lax about staying up-to-date on your COVID vaccine schedule — less than 20 percent have received updated vaccines according to the CDC — you may want to consider getting some extra protection by taking a probiotic like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic, formulated with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria and a prebiotic that feeds the beneficial bacteria in your gut.

Advisory note
For the most up-to-date advisories on COVID-19, visit the CDC website at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

Resources

Clinical Nutrition
Duke Health/News and Media
Washington Post

Could Probiotics Protect You From COVID? Read More »

PTSD, Your Diet and Your Gut

PTSD, Your Diet and Your Gut

Summary: The diet you follow and how your gut manages it may determine how you’ll experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

It’s hard to imagine a connection between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the human gut until you recognize how the gut-brain axis links your brain, gut and emotions.
Unfortunately, many of us only notice our gut-brain axis when those connections are disrupted by many factors, including poor diets that often lead to an array of gut-related health problems that drive inflammation.

The good news: Following a gut-healthy Mediterranean diet can do a lot of good to ease or even prevent PTSD-related symptoms, based on findings featured recently in Nature Mental Health.

Healthy eating for mental health

Researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston teamed up on the report that collected data on 191 women from the Nurses’ Health Study.
These women were assigned to three categories: Probable PTSD, trauma exposure but no PTSD and a control group with no trauma exposure. Patients were evaluated on everything from BMI, diet, age, mental health and PTSD symptoms to multiple stool samples.
When researchers compared the diets women consumed to the number of PTSD symptoms they experienced, that’s where the differences in mental health became very apparent.
Women who consumed standard Western diets high in red and processed meats experienced more PTSD challenges while others who followed healthier Mediterranean diets faced fewer symptoms.
What’s more, scientists identified a specific species of gut bacteria — Eubacterium eligens — whose abundance was positively associated with patients who experienced fewer PTSD problems and ate diets rich in the fruits, healthy fats, vegetables and fish that make up the standard Mediterranean diet.

The major takeaway from this study: If you are experiencing mental health challenges, working on your gut-brain axis connection by eating healthier meals with higher amounts of dietary fiber, incorporating more exercise in your daily routine and getting more sleep matters.
When you’re working long days and you don’t have the time to follow your healthier routines, give your gut some extra protection by taking a probiotic, ideally with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria and a prebiotic that feeds the good bugs in your gut, like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

References

Nature Mental Health
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
NBC News
Cleveland Clinic

PTSD, Your Diet and Your Gut Read More »

10 Beneficial Strains of EndoMune Advanced Probiotic

The 10 Beneficial Strains That Make Up EndoMune Advanced Probiotic

Summary: Learn more about the 10 beneficial strains of beneficial bacteria that make up EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

For a long time, we’ve talked about the many advantages a multi-strain probiotic like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic with  10 strains and 30 billion CFUs of beneficial bacteria (plus the awesome prebiotic FOS) contains in each capsule.

Some of you have been asking what those individual strains of beneficial bacteria can actually do for the health of your gut and body. What follows is a quick and easy-to-understand review of each powerful strain of beneficial bacteria featured in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

Bifidobacterium bifidum: Based on research, this bacterial strain may be helpful in treating certain kinds of diarrhea, infections related to H. pylori and relieving symptoms of IBS and constipation.
Bifidobacterium breve: This bacterial strain helps you fight nasty bugs that could cause health problems and also allows your body to absorb nutrients and break down food.
Bifidobacterium lactis: This bacterial strain promotes human health by aiding in absorbing minerals and vitamins and helping your microbiome rebound from antibiotic-associated diarrhea, upper respiratory tract infections and constipation. (This bacterial strain treats your fussy baby’s colic too!)
Bifidobacterium longum: One of the most common species in your gut while you are an infant, the amount of this bacterial strain lessens as you get older but it still does the hard work of working generating short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) like butyrate that lowers your gut’s pH levels and protects it from pathogenic bacteria.
Streptococcus thermophilus: This bacterial strain can help you better digest nutrients such as proteins and lipids as well as milk. (That’s why this bacterial strain is contained in some brands of yogurt.)
Lactobacillus acidophilus: One of the most studied probiotic strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus can be an effective way to treat diarrhea and help with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), high cholesterol, yeast infections, cold and flu symptoms, bacterial vaginosis and reducing eczema in young babies.
Lactobacillus casei: This bacterial species has been shown to display antimicrobial strength against antibiotic-resistant bacteria and protect the function of the intestinal epithelial cells that line the large and small intestines.
Lactobacillus plantarum: Besides increasing the diversity of flora in your gut, this bacterial strain may support the health of your brain and heart and improve your body’s absorption of iron.
Lactobacillus rhamnosus: In addition to treating diarrhea and promoting the growth of beneficial bacteria in your gut, this bacterial species may help in preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs) and even cavities.
Lactococcus lactis: Along with improving how you digest food, this strain of beneficial bacteria may also lessen your risk of serious health problems including diabetes and cancer and reduce your stress levels.

Resources
https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-health-benefits-of-bifobacterium-4684233
https://www.healthline.com/health/bifidobacterium-bifidum
https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1666/bifidobacterium-bifidum
https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1665/bifidobacterium-breve
Bifidobacterium lactis

Bifidobacterium longum

Streptococcus thermophilus
Streptococcus thermophilus: A Surprisingly Warm Probiotic


Lactobacillus
https://www.verywellhealth.com/acidophilus-and-other-probiotics-88321
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9668099/
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/lactobacillus-acidophilus#TOC_TITLE_HDR_7
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/lactobacillus-rhamnosus#_noHeaderPrefixedContent
https://www.healthline.com/health/digestive-health/lactobacillus-casei
https://www.optibacprobiotics.com/professionals/probiotics-database/lactobacillus/lactobacillus-casei
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intestinal_epithelium
https://www.optibacprobiotics.com/professionals/probiotics-database/lactobacillus/lactobacillus-plantarum
Exploring the Lactobacillus Plantarum Benefits from Probiotics

https://atlasbiomed.com/blog/top-12-lactobacillus-probiotics/#rhamnosus-gg
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/lactobacillus-rhamnosus

Lactococcus lactis
https://www.digicomply.com/dietary-supplements-database/lactococcus-lactis

The 10 Beneficial Strains That Make Up EndoMune Advanced Probiotic Read More »

Safe to use Probiotics to help treat type 2 diabetes.

Probiotics: An Effective Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes?

Summary: Is it safe and helpful to take a probiotic if you’re coping with type 2 diabetes? This survey of studies gives a thumbs-up to probiotics!

As the epidemic of metabolic syndrome continues in America — thanks to a Western lifestyle that can kill you faster than smoking — the number of Americans dealing with type 2 diabetes is growing by the day.

Among the 38 million Americans who currently suffer from diabetes, roughly 90 percent of them are dealing with type 2 diabetes. (An alarming 22 percent don’t even know they have diabetes at all!)

You can do plenty of things to manage your health if you have type 2 diabetes, from diversifying your diet to include more unprocessed whole foods to finding more time during day to get moving with some form of exercise.

Researchers have also learned so much about how an unbalanced gut microbiome affects many aspects of human health, including how it creates many challenges for type 2 diabetes patients trying to regulate their blood sugar.

If you or a loved one is struggling with managing type 2 diabetes, taking a probiotic should be at the top of your to-do list too, based on a recent review of 33 studies appearing in Nutrients.

Nearly two-thirds of the studies Canadian researchers reviewed reported improvements in at least one measurement related to glycemic levels while taking a probiotic.

In addition, nearly half of those reports cited improvements in lipid levels after taking a probiotic. That’s very important given that elevated levels of LDL lipoproteins can greatly raise one’s risks of cardiovascular diseases.

Also, the benefits of multi-strain probiotics formulated with strains from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families really stuck out with 16 studies reporting improvements in at least one glycemic measurement.

This makes sense given that the Bifidobacterium family enhances the production of healthy fatty acids and the digestion of fiber while promoting immune health and the Lactobacillus family assists the protection of the barrier lining the gut.

Finally, probiotics also worked very well with metformin, a go-to drug prescribed for type 2 diabetics, enriching the composition of gut bacteria, decreasing insulin resistance and increasing the abundance of beneficial short chain fatty acids (SCFAs).

While there’s much more research to be done, there’s little doubt that probiotics, especially those formulated with multiple strains of bacteria like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic, can be a boon to the health of type 2 diabetes patients.

Resources
Nutrients
News-Medical.net/Life Sciences
CDC
Mayo Clinic
Medline Plus

Probiotics: An Effective Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes? Read More »

Can Probiotics Improve Your Blood Pressure

Can Probiotics Improve Your Blood Pressure?

Summary: Probiotics may be helpful in lowering your blood pressure.

Nearly half of all American adults suffer from high blood pressure/hypertension for a lot of reasons, including consuming more sugar and salt from highly processed foods in their diets than ever before.

There are many ways to treat hypertension/blood pressure from simple lifestyle changes (getting more sleep, eating a less salty diet, incorporating more movement via exercise and maintaining a healthy weight) to taking medicines.

Unfortunately, many people rely solely on medications to help them manage their elevated blood pressure but 20 percent of all patients won’t respond to them at all, even when using multiple drugs.

Recent studies we’ve shared have shown how hypertension and your gut health are linked in very interesting ways with some medication combinations worsening blood pressure symptoms.

So, we weren’t surprised to learn that a multi-species probiotic formulated with strains from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families was responsible for lowering blood pressure numbers to normal levels, according to a recent study appearing in mSystems.

Multi-species probiotics for the win!
A team of Chinese researchers tested the benefits of multi-strain probiotics on hypertension in a study with mice fed water mixed with sugar that had elevated their blood pressures to unhealthy levels.

Over 16 weeks, scientists compared blood pressure readings of test animals that received a probiotic containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium lactis to a group of mice that didn’t receive one and a control group fed water without sugar.
(These two strains of beneficial bacteria are among the building block species featured in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.)

The most interesting finding from the report: Blood pressure levels among mice treated with a multi-strain probiotic were healthy and no different than mice only fed water. Also, scientists identified gut bacteria signatures in probiotic mice that were typical among people with lower pressures.

The results were so positive that this research team is planning a larger clinical trial to discover if these same probiotic benefits hold up for humans.

We expect to hear similar rave reviews for probiotics, given the results of a recent study touting the benefits of prebiotics lowering blood pressure levels among people equal to that of blood pressure medications.

Just another reason that taking a probiotic with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria and a prebiotic like EndoMune can make a world of difference to your health and your gut, the center of your immune system

References
mSystems
American Society For Microbiology
CDC
Mayo Clinic

Can Probiotics Improve Your Blood Pressure? Read More »

Ozempic and Wegovy: Are New Weight Loss Drugs Really Safe?

Ozempic and Wegovy: Are New Weight Loss Drugs Really Safe?

  Summary: Recent reports about the safety of Ozempic and Wegovy, injectable drugs prescribed by doctors to help you lose weight, should make you think long and hard about using them.   You’ve probably heard a lot recently about a pair of blockbuster drugs — Wegovy and Ozempic (semaglutide) — for their effectiveness in helping people lose A LOT of weight.   Obesity affects so many Americans — more than 40 percent are obese according to the CDC — that people will try almost anything to lose weight.   Taking weekly injections of Wegovy or Ozempic work to slow down the emptying of the stomach and decrease one’s appetite, and could help someone drop about 12 percent of their body weight.   If these results sound almost too good to be true, the unfortunate reality for some patients has been heartbreaking and life-threatening.  

The Problems with Semaglutide

  According to reports received by the FDA, the most serious problems are associated with severe gastroparesis, also known as stomach paralysis. And, in one case reported by CNN, a woman suffered from severe gastroparesis along with nausea and cyclic vomiting syndrome (characterized by episodes of severe vomiting that can last for hours or days).   What’s more, the American Society of Anesthesiologists recently issued a warning urging patients to cease taking these medications up to a week before surgery. Their concern: A slower emptying of the stomach could allow patients to regurgitate and aspirate food into their airways and lungs when they’re sedated, even after fasting.   Even if you don’t have an extreme version of those kinds of problems, the most common side effects of Wegovy are nausea (44 percent of all users), diarrhea (30 percent) and vomiting and constipation (24 percent).   Also, for either of these drugs to work as directed, you must take them weekly to keep the weight off, or those extra pounds will come back quickly.  

Are Weight Loss Drugs the Only Answer to Effective Weight Loss?

  Did you know there’s a better, safer way to slow down your appetite, eat less and lose weight without the expense or common side effects of an injectable drug like Wegovy or Ozempic?   You may want to give your weight-loss journey a fresh start with the help of EndoMune Metabolic Rescue that contains 1 billion CFUs of beneficial Bifidobacterium lactis and 600 mg of the prebiotic XOS.   XOS is a proven prebiotic that spurs the production of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that trigger some of the same mechanisms Wegovy does to slow down the movement of food from your stomach and create a feeling of fullness naturally.    

Resources

  CNN Health   UC Health   Healthline   CBS News   CDC   Drugs.com    

Ozempic and Wegovy: Are New Weight Loss Drugs Really Safe? Read More »

Photo of a girl's face with acne. Text reads :Acne & Probiotics

Probiotics May Relieve Acne Outbreaks

Acne and Probiotics

No matter how common it is, acne can be a very touchy and painful subject for people of all ages.

Although acne often arises during the teenage years of raging hormones, it can happen at any stage of life, as we’ve seen with the dramatic rise in maskne during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Medical experts estimate 80 percent of us will experience at least one form of acne by age 30, while others never develop it until they reach adulthood.

While hormones typically drive acne, other variables like clothing, menstrual cycles, high humidity, oily or greasy personal care products and some medications can trigger or worsen acne breakouts.

Depending on the severity of acne, treatments range from non-prescription creams and washes applied topically, all the way to tetracycline antibiotics (minocycline and doxycycline) that can disrupt the healthy balance of bacteria in your gut.

Let’s take a quick look at some findings that link the health of your gut microbiome to your skin.

 

The Gut-Skin Connection In Action

Medical science appears to be catching on to the gut-skin connection based on the growing number of studies comparing acne problems to common gut health issues. For example:

  • Patients suffering from acne vulgaris (a condition in which hair follicles are blocked by dead skin cells, oil and bacteria) and eczema (a condition that makes your skin itchy and red) are experiencing alarming decreases in beneficial bacteria.
  • The prevalence of antibiotic resistance among patients that makes these drugs far less effective over time is a very real problem.
  • Eating a Western diet full of carbs, fiber-poor processed foods and sugar may harm your gut and your skin.
  • The incidence of irritable bowel syndrome was found to be significantly more common among patients suffering from acne vulgaris, according to the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.

These are just a few of the breadcrumbs that clearly point in the direction of a real gut-skin link, but what about a solution that’s safe for your skin and microbiome?

 

Probiotics To The Rescue

Extensive reports from Microorganisms, Frontiers in Microbiology, Experimental Dermatology and the Journal of Clinical Medicine point to evidence that treating skin conditions like acne with oral probiotics can be effective.

The common link: The oral probiotics tested successfully in these studies were formulated with strains from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium families, including some of the proven strains contained in EndoMune Advanced Probiotic and EndoMune Junior Advanced Chewable Probiotic.

We recognize that there’s much work still to be done to build a bigger base of knowledge to really understand the hows and whys, but the evidence seems clear to us that taking a probiotic with multiple strains of beneficial bacteria like EndoMune can be good for your gut and your skin.

 

Resources

Probiotics May Relieve Acne Outbreaks Read More »

Graphic of large intestine next to a pharmaceutical prescription bottle. Text reads "Antibiotics: Rising Colon Cancer Risks Among Young People

Antibiotics And The Risk Of Colon Cancer

Antibiotics: Rising Colon Cancer Risks Among Young People

For a very long time, health professionals and patients believed colon cancer — the third most common cancer among Americans — was a major health challenge mainly for older folks.

That perception changed for good recently, when the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force recommended lowering initial screenings for colon cancer to age 45.

That was a huge wake-up call, but a very necessary one given the steady increase in younger colon cancer cases and lower screening rates among that age group.

That uptick also reflects data collected by the American Cancer Society that found patients born in 1990 have double the risk of colon cancer compared to people born in 1950.

All of this underscores the fact that colon cancer is a multi-faceted problem, including several risk factors (poor diets and sedentary lifestyles) well within our control.

We can now add antibiotics to the growing list of concerns based a pair of recent reports from the UK and Sweden.

 

More Antibiotics, More Colon Cancer Reports

Most of you are very well aware of the disruptive nature of antibiotics, and not just to the balance of bacteria in your gut.

Antibiotics have been prescribed so often for health problems, including viral conditions like the flu and common colds that they’re not equipped to treat, they don’t work when we really need them.

Based on two large analyses of patients in Scotland and Sweden, this very liberal use of antibiotics may increase one’s colon cancer risks too.

In the Swedish analysis that studied the health of 40,000 patients from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry from 2010-16 to 200,000 cancer-free patients, antibiotics increased the risk of colon cancer by 17 percent.

What’s more, Swedish scientists believe the disruptive impact of antibiotics on the microbiome is the probable trigger for this increase in colon cancer patients.

The Scottish review of 8,000 colon cancer patients that compared to an equal number of healthy folks found a similar increase in colon cancer rates across all age groups, with one more very alarming trend.

The risk of colon cancer among patients under age 50 was elevated by nearly 50 percent, compared to 9 percent in the above age 50 group. What’s more, very common quinolone (like Cipro) and sulfonamide (like Bactrim) antibiotics were associated with cancers on the right side of the colon where microbiomes reside.

So, how can colon cancer risks jump so high for younger folks apart from the overuse of antibiotics and sedentary lifestyle habits?

Experts believe the lack of routine screenings for young people from ages 20-40 account for high colon cancer rates. Moreover, fewer physicians and younger patients will connect unusual abdominal pains with colon cancer, thus those problems will be detected much later when the disease is harder to treat.

 

What You Can Do!

First, it’s important to remember that taking any antibiotics should be done wisely and cautiously. If you have any concerns about an antibiotic (or any other drug), don’t hesitate to consult with your doctor or pharmacist.

When an antibiotic is necessary, please take it as prescribed by your physician until your course is completed, not only until you’re feeling better.

Want to lessen your need for antibiotics? I urge you to review my recent Antibiotics 101 article for some very important tips that cover everything from good hand-cleaning rules to monitoring your use of prescription pain relievers.

If you want to protect the healthy balance of bacteria in your gut, especially while you’re taking an antibiotic, be sure to take a probiotic about two hours afterward. (Check out our article on the basics of How to Take a Probiotic for more guidance.)

Also, there’s growing evidence we’ve shared here about the benefits of taking a probiotic in relation to treating and possibly preventing colon cancer.

Remember that any probiotic you consider should include multiple strains of beneficial bacteria to protect your gut, the center of your body’s immune system, like those found in like EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.

 

Resources

Journal of the National Cancer Institute

Umea University

Annals of Oncology

National Cancer Institute

WebMD

Keck Medicine of USC

European Society for Medical Oncology

 

 

 

Antibiotics And The Risk Of Colon Cancer Read More »

Ali Bourgerie of Shifting Nutrition sitting down with two EndoMune bottles

Q&A with Ali Bourgerie, Board-Certified Holistic Nutritionist and Founder of Shifting Nutrition

Tell us about your background and how you found yourself starting your own business focused on holistic health and nutrition.

I grew up an athlete and from a young age was conscious about what I ate, but in high school I had a lot of digestive issues. I went to college and got my first degree in health and exercise science and came out of school thinking I had landed my dream job training professional athletes. From that experience and being a body builder as well as still dealing with gut health issues, I started doing my own research and realized that it was all about what I was putting in my body that mattered most, for both my physical and mental health.

I was so eager to learn more about how I could heal my body naturally and feel the best results I was after and decided to go back to school to get my master’s in nutrition. After graduation, I moved to Portland, Oregon, and worked under a naturopath for several years while building my business that I have now on the side. I learned even more that the ultimate goal is to get the body into balance, and that doing so in a natural way is the best way to improve health and see and feel results. This led me to Shifting Nutrition and helping my clients today.

Why do you think it is important to combine good nutrition with education for your clients?

I am all about using whole foods as medicine to change lives, not a quick fix in 30 days. I find if clients understand why – the purpose behind it – it makes all the difference. The education piece on why we are doing what we are doing and eating what we are eating is what makes new healthy habits stick and become sustainable in the long run. In order to continue to do something we must understand WHY we are doing it. For example, why eating a wide variety of vegetables is important; not just the different vitamins and minerals, but how eating a wide variety of plants brings different nutrients. Or why taking a probiotic supplement can benefit your overall health. The wider the variety of beneficial bacteria present in our body, the better our gut health. I truly believe knowledge is power!

Do you recommend probiotics for all your clients? What benefits do you see to adding probiotics to your daily regimen?

I recommend probiotics for the majority of people. Some are ready; others need some time before introducing probiotics. It depends on where they are in their journey. The overall goal of taking them is to balance the ecosystem within our bodies and influence the activity of the healthy bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract, which research now shows is necessary for improving our overall health. Many Americans eat a diet and live a lifestyle that causes dysbiosis, a bacterial imbalance within primarily the stomach and intestines. This can stem from too much sugar, food additives, lingering pesticides, drinking too much alcohol, and even high levels of stress and anxiety. Common symptoms my clients experience include bad breath, upset stomach, constipation or diarrhea, bloating, fatigue, anxiety, and difficulty concentrating. So, yes, for most people I believe a probiotic can help.

The gut-brain axis is a critical connection in our bodies, and you mention it in several of your posts. How do you help educate your clients about this connection that they may not have heard about before?

When we get the feeling of butterflies in our stomach, this tells us the gut and brain are very connected. What we call the gut-brain axis is how the two organs communicate. Our gut contains 500 million neurons that send signals back and forth in both directions. They are also connected through chemicals called neurotransmitters, which control feelings and emotions. GABA and serotonin are transmitters present in the gut that link to mood, sleep, and feelings of anxiety. We also have trillions of microbes in the gut, which make chemicals that affect how our brain and the rest of our body works including how our immune system responds. This axis shows the importance of taking care of our gut health in order to bring the body into balance and start to diminish some symptoms.

How do you see EndoMune Metabolic Rescue benefitting clients or people looking to lose weight?

I do recommend Metabolic Rescue for naturally curbing appetite and cravings. I guide my clients to work with their bodies, not against them.  When we are in tune with our bodies we are more in tune with our appetite and better at reading our body. We learn more about our true eating habits. Why are we eating? Out of boredom, because someone else around us is eating, or eating just because it’s time for a meal rather than feeling hungry. Reading our body better will naturally start to lower overall caloric intake without our feeling restricted. I am all about the mindset when it comes to food, and I think feeling restricted is one of the biggest things people struggle with. Taking EndoMune Metabolic Rescue, which is not harmful yet beneficial toward reaching their goals, I think is great.

What changes did you see in your own body when you started taking EndoMune Advanced and Metabolic Rescue?

I loved them pretty quickly; it only took a couple of days to notice a difference. The strains and combination were exactly what I wanted and was looking for in a probiotic, which is entirely important when choosing a brand. I had some inflammation and digestive issues like bloating and gas calm down, and my bowels were more regular. Over the haul, it eased cravings and I noticed my natural energy improve. My immune system seemed stronger, as I did not catch the colds my boyfriend caught.  I knew it was doing the job.

Q&A with Ali Bourgerie, Board-Certified Holistic Nutritionist and Founder of Shifting Nutrition Read More »

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